Wednesday, March 23, 2005

Architecture and Design of Man and Woman: The Marvel of the Human Body, Revealed


Architecture and Design of Man and Woman: The Marvel of the Human Body, Revealed uses the principles of structural engineering to explain the development of the human body, suggesting that physical forces are more important than genetic code in designing tissues, organs, and the human structure as a whole. Like bridges, buildings, and motor vehicles, the body is an engine that has its own pulleys, belts, axles, flywheels, and shock absorbers. Bones, which are stronger than steel by weight, provide the framework. Ironically, what we see, skin, hair, and nails, are dead cells. The living cells are hidden.

In Architecture and Design of Man and Woman: The Marvel of the Human Body, Revealed, illustration is primary and text secondary. I hesitate to call the illustrations beautiful, for they show intestines and muscles and inner organs, but I am in awe of the art. How did Tsiaras manage to create images in which viewer see the outside surfaces and the organs underneath? He seems to have mixed photography and air brush painting. His photos comparing human tissues and organs with other forms in nature are striking.

There is much for readers to learn. Did you know that at one point in the early development of the human embryo, growth is 250,000 cells per minute? Tsiaras also created From Conception to Birth: A Life Unfolds. Public libraries should have both.

Tsiaras, Alexander. Architecture and Design of Man and Woman: The Marvel of the Human Body, Revealed. New York : Doubleday : 2004. ISBN 0385509294

1 comment:

Shirley said...

I no longer purchase the books in this area, but I did so for so long that I've had a hard time "letting go" :) and I still watch the reviews. I'll bring this book to our selector's attention. Thanks!