Friday, March 03, 2006

Morton's Neuroma: A Librarian Looks at Consumer Health Reference Sources

An Unremarkable Left Foot

Oh! My left foot! Sometime before Thanksgiving, it began to hurt. When I took my first step of the day, a shot of pain came from my bare foot as it touched our bedroom's hardwood floor. Examining it, I found a little swelling on the bottom of my foot between the third and fourth toes. I assumed I had a bruise and tried to ignore the discomfort. I hardly noticed anything once I had slippers or shoes on. After a few days I did not notice the pain again.

The pain returned a few days before Christmas. The swelling was greater, as was the pain, and standing in the shower was excruciating. I went to see my general practitioner. He guessed that I had a small fracture that would heal itself and he sent me to the hospital for x-rays. A few days later he called to say the x-rays did not show any fractures or tumors. Since my foot still hurt, he recommended several podiatrists, one of which was located only three blocks from my home. I got an appointment for a week later. I also got a copy of the x-ray report, which concluded "unremarkable left foot."

By the day of my appointment, my condition had greatly improved, but there was still something strange. It felt as though I had a seed or a bubble in my foot, something that at times popped slightly, and the pain returned if I had to walk far on sidewalks or around the supermarket (which seems to have a really hard floor). On bad days I mostly sat at the reference desk, using the Internet more than the reference books to help clients. Better was not well.

My trip to the podiatrist was unlike any appointment I have had in recent times. I arrived twenty minutes before the appointment as recommended to do first visit paperwork. I was in an examining room fifteen minutes before my set time. Within minutes I saw the doctor, and I left the building before my appointment time.

The podiatrist listened to my story, examined my foot, and diagnosed a common Morton's neuroma, a benign inflammation of nerves. He said that there are two nerves that cross right below a bone in the foot. The inflammation might go away on its own, but if it did not, it could be treated with an injection of corticosteroids or by surgery. In the meantime, if needed, I could take ibuprofen to lessen the pain and wear inserts in my shoe (which I had already discovered). He wrote "Morton's Neuroma" on a slip of paper, and I began my research.

A good question is why I did not research the topic on my own before the visit. You would think that a reference librarian would. Anne Kozak (head of the Thomas Ford Memorial Library) suggested Morton's neuroma to me when I was sure I had a fracture. Having the condition herself, she recognized the symptoms. ( I checked Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA)
to see if there is a library epidemic, but there is none.) So, would I have recognized the condition from an examination of the reference sources? What now follows is what I have found.


Reference Books

These are the sources we use every day as reference librarians helping our clients. They disagree on definition, causes, seriousness, and treatment of the condition. It can be a thickening of tissue, an inflammation, or a tumor, depending on the source. They do not even agree on the location of the neuroma.

American Medical Association Family Medical Guide, 4th edition - I found the term in the index. The entry that I found (on page 981 under the heading "Pain in the Front of the Foot") is very short, made up of one paragraph and a bullet list. It says most cases of Morton’s neuroma occur on top of the foot, but the condition can also affect the ball of the foot. My case is on the ball. It recommends going barefoot, which is contrary to my experience and my doctor’s advice. Wearing slippers or shoes helps me. The last suggestion is padding the tender spot.

Dorlands's Medical Dictionary - Morton's neuroma results from Morton's neuralgia. The neuroma is a noncancerous tumor. Neuralgia is pain.

Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, 2nd edition - No information.

Professional Guide to Diseases, 8th edition - I found the term in the index, which led me to a one sentence definition in section on rare diseases.

Mayo Clinic Family Health Book, 3rd ed. - I found the term in the index. The entry starting on page 969 includes four short paragraphs. The description of burning pain true. I am advised to wear sandals or well-fitting shoes; adding inserts may also help. Steroid injections or surgery might help in extreme cases, according to this source.

Outline of Orthopaedics, 13th ed. – I found Morton's metatarsalgia in the index. Keep a medical dictionary handy if you use this book. It explains that a neuroma is a fibrous thickening. The usual patient is described as a middle aged woman. I recognize the “clicking” in the foot and agree with the desire to remove my shoe and manipulate the spot from which the pain radiates. It recommends padding in shoes as the first treatment and surgery if necessary.

Merck Manual of Medical Information, 2nd Home ed. - The term is in the index. "Pain Caused by Damage to the Nerves in the Ball" on page 403 describes a mild ache.

"A person may also feel as if a marble or pebble were inside the ball of the foot." That captures the feeling pretty well. The Merck says a local anesthetic is included in the corticosteroid shot.

Complete Guide to Symptoms, Illness & Surgery, 4th ed. - This work says little about the condition, but it does describe surgery from the bottom of the foot. It says that I wouldn't be able to drive for a week or exercise for six weeks.

None of the other signs and symptoms books that I saw mentions the condition, making it hard to self-diagnose.



Magazine Articles

Literature about Morton's neuroma in magazines is quite varied.

McGinnis, Marianne. "Happy Feet Happy You."
Prevention. April 2003. Vol. 55, p. 44. - Bad shoes and improper foot care seem to get the blame for most foot problems in this list of ailments. It recommends taping a pad on the ball of the foot.

"On Your Mind."
Consumer Reports on Health. September 1995, vol. 7, p. 108 - This advice column suggests starting treatment with injections of anesthetics and corticosteroids.

Childs, Sharon G. "Interdigital Perineural Fibroma (A.K.A. Morton's Neuroma)."
Orthopaedic Nursing. November/December 2002. Vol. 21, p. 32. - The condition was named for Dr. Thomas Morton who described it in 1876. Other names include Morton's toe, interdigital neuritis, and interdigital perineural fibroma. It says that 90 percent of women eventually get this condition. The physical forces that lead to the condition are described. It does seem to come down to bad footwear.

Childs, Sharon G. "Diagnosis and Treatment of Interdigital Perineural Fibroma (A.K.A. Morton's Neuroma)."
Orthopaedic Nursing. November/December 2002. Vol. 21, p. 35. - The reader may learn much about nerves in the foot. Conservative treatments are recommended before injections and surgery. A case of Morton's neuroma running in a family suggests to the author the term Morton's syndrome might be appropriate.

Gulick, Dwn T. "Differential Diagnosis of Morton's Neuroma."
Athletic Therapy Today. January 2002. Photos show how to examine the foot. The examiner is supposed to look for the Mulder sign, which is the click of the tissues involved. Surgury from the top of the foot is described.


Web Sources

Podiatry Channel - This web page has an explanation of the condition more like what my podiatrist gave than any other source. There is good anatomical illustration that can be enlarged with a click. It was the first source I found that described the possible complications of surgery. It is possible to replace the pain from the neuroma (removed during surgery) with pain from scar tissue from surgery.

MayoClinic.com - I finally found the difference between Morton's neuroma and metatarsalgia, which some sources use as synonyms. The latter is on the ball. Morton's neuroma is between the third and fourth toes. There is much more on the web site than in the
Mayo Clinic Family Health Book.

Aetna InteliHealth - The content on this page comes from Harvard Medical School's Consumer Health Information. It is the only source that I have seen that states the patient should not expect the condition to disappear. On the brighter side, it also states that conservative treatment of better shoes, padding, and pain relief are sufficient in 80 percent of cases.

Wikipedia - No one has given this entry much attention. It does link to the
Podiatry Channel and the Mayo Clinic and is the only site that I have seen with the ICD codes.

There are many other web sources of varying quality.


Conclusion


There is a lot of confusing information about Morton's neuroma. No one source told me all I needed to know. If I am confused by this, just imagine all the people who come into our libraries seeking health and medical information on health topics. Be sure to offer them a range of sources.


Prognosis

I am actually doing quite well now. My symptoms are for now very mild, and I hope they stay that way. I will not be surprised if it flares up again. I will try to avoid that by wearing good shoes and inserts. Bicycling and swimming instead of running are in my plans (not that I ever liked running anyway). I hope to avoid injections. I do not want to have anything to do with the surgery. Wish me luck.

155 comments:

Meredith said...

I hope your symptoms stay mild, Rick! My mother has the same problem and she has made it her mission to find the most comfortable shoes in the known world. She's had it for a while, but she's still able to play tennis almost every day. It's all about comfortable shoes with LOTS of padding and spending as little time barefoot as possible. She says that sometimes putting moleskin on the affected area for extra padding helps and she recommends http://www.footsmart.com/ for comfort shoes and other stuff.

mona said...

I think it would be really neat if there were more consumer health libraries, not for hospitals and medical schools, but for everyday Joes and Janes. I was trying to envision what kind of community would trigger such an institution and except for a few rare situations I have trouble seeing where funding would come from. As a seasoned librarian (i'm just a student yet), do you see any?

Good luck with that foot, btw.

Conner said...

How is your morton's neuroma now?

I ask, because I am going through the exact same steps you are, except they gave me a shot yesterday.

Let me know.

Conner

ricklibrarian said...

I am doing well now (six weeks later) and only know it is there if I take off my shoe and feel. A week or so ago I felt it a little. It probably not going away.

louise said...

I was just diagnosed with Morton's neuroma yesterday, given the 1st of 3-5 shots of NON-steroid alcolhol solution, given 2 weeks apart, which I was told is 85% effective, told it's better to do it now (I've had on and off symptoms for about a year) than when it gets worse. I had done pre-podiatry appt internet research and diagnosed myself with metatarsalgia, was told No, it's a neuroma. For me, the pain was manageable (I walk 15-20 miles/week), but I was being proactive by making the appt. Now I'm debating continuing the shots. I found one article on the internet about these new non-steroid shots (told by dr. "no side effect" as opposed to cortisone) Anyone on your site experienced with these shots?

Anonymous said...

Christina said
I am going through the exact same process as louise. After at least 1 year of problems with my foot I have eliminated all my heeled shoes, I only wear flats, always wear cushioned shoes at home on the tile. Merrell sandals have made a difference due to the amazing amount of cushioning that is built into the shoe. I have had to stop running; foot sports seems to irritate the nerve ball. It starts to heat up and burn if I wear biking shoes and go for long distances or run. I finally went to a podiatrist with my self diagnosis and he has started the first of a series of shots, 10 days apart. There has been no relief after the first shot. I will tell you that he froze the top of my foot with a spray before he put the needle it and there was NO PAIN when it was done like that. I have 2 girlfriends that have undergone the surgury successfully and have had no additional difficulties. My doctor says that if you have the nerve removed you lose feeling in the 4 and 5th toes which is why he tries the shots first.

Anonymous said...

New Jersey

I was diagnosed with Morton's Neuroma a week ago and my orthopedic surgeon gave me a cortisone shot. He used the spray and told me it would hurt when he injected the site. Let me tell you the pain was unbelievable. The swelling seems worse even with icing it. So far no relief and I feel I will go with padding, inserts or gels. No more shots for me. I am also recovering from knee surgery which was very extensive and only took one pain pill during the past 4 weeks. The shot was 100 times more painful.

Erin said...

Hello. I was diagnosed with Morton's about 5 weeks ago. I have been wearing only my Birkenstocks ever since. But I am looking for a good running shoe as I would like to start running again, one day. Can anyone recommend a good running shoe for those with Morton's?
By the way I work in a library too....

garnetlover said...

Having pain in my foot which did not fit anything I found for foot pain on the Internet, I went to foot doctor. He diagnosed pressure on the nerve and gave me a nerve block. I had no pain in my foot, or my knee, or my leg, of my hip or my lower back. I can't remember NOT being in pain and was euphoric. It wore off in 48 hours and then he gave me a shot which I believe is Slerosing Shots which were described by others as alcohol. That was 2 days ago and I am miserable. Is this normal? Burning sensations dull throb. I've trid to find information on this threatment but nothing that answers my questions about it! Like others, I don't know if I want to continue with this treatment. I can't use cortisone because of diabetes and bad reactions to it. I found a photo ot a foot with open incision and photo of neuroma and that is a deep cut. I've had history of blot clots, too. I have had my immune system supressed. Not interested in surgery for sure. I've got diabetic shoes by www.drcomfortshoes.com ordered and hope they help. This is a GREAT WEBSITE.

Anonymous said...

I suffered with this pain in the ball of my foot for a few months on and off. I found it hurt the most whenever I walked any distance but would subside if I rested a while. Finally, after a visit to the podiatrist for an ingrown toenail, I mentioned this on/off pain and he pressed the bottom of my foot between the 2nd and 3rd toes; I saw stars. He smiled and said it was Morton's Neuroma. He gave me a cortisone shot on the first visit. At a subsequent visit I mentioned that I didn't think the shot had helped so he gave me another and a pad to wear on my foot to help spread the bones. I noticed that wearing the pad helped a lot & perhaps more than the shot. If I walked without the padding, my foot would bother me again. It felt like a rock under my toes. On my third visit I mentioned that the padding really helped. I was able to go away on vacation and had little or no pain. He put pads in the shoes that I wear on a regular basis and felt that I should have one more shot before saying that it didn't help. Well, tonight I'm having a LOT of pain in the area and could barely walk even with the padding. Initially I had a very itchy sensation in the area below the toes, then the pain. I iced the area and just rested. I'm hoping tomorrow will be better. All of this, though, prompted me to look for additional information especially reactions to cortisone shots. I found this website very informative. Thank you.

Cindy said...

Cindy Mississippi
I was diagnosed with Metatarsal Phalangia Overload by one doctor and received a second opinion in which he said Morton’s Neuroma. All I know is I am very fortunate if I am able to walk each day. I am in so VERY much pain. I have had to take medical leave from work. I have had one injection from the doctor that says Morton’s but that is all he will give. He says when I return we will schedule surgery. I returned to the orthopedist and she was not happy. She said that is only a small portion of my problem. I am not getting anywhere. She sent me to a pain management specialist and he gave me Lyrica which is supposed to help with the nerves of the feet. It gives very little relief. I have worn the running shoe I was prescribed for 3 months now and she has threatened me not to wear anything else. They have carbon shank inserts. My Merrell sandals have been my saving grace that gets me out of bed and around for the first hour or so. Padding makes it worse because it thickens the area. I have heard so many NEGATIVE things about the surgery but I have got to find relief and be normal again. I am 42 and use to be so very active and this has taken everything out of me except my faith in God. I want to walk again without pain, shop, work, be with family and friends, enjoy life! Help!!! Any success stories with surgery? I really believe Morton’s Neuroma is my only problem and that it has peaked to the highest level!

Anonymous said...

I just got my special drcomfort shoes in a walker style and wore them about 2 hours and OMG it was miserable. I was so disappointed and depressed that I was in tears. I bought a pair of slippers with hard soles at Walmarts which have a lot of toe room with hard soles and leather tops & a little fuzzy trim. I put the molded insoles in the slippers and I am at least comfortable walking around the house. And like Cindy, I believe this one little problem causes a lot of pain through the knee, hip and lower back. I am still looking for a comfortable shoe. I wish Hushpuppies made their Walker shoes with just a little more toe room.

Anonymous said...

I have been dealing with Mortons Neuroma for some time now and just yesterday I got a steriod shot. I have had no relief and have been told to come back for 5 more shots every two weeks. I am concerned about the side effects to the shots and not sure if I want to continue them. Has anyone had the surgery? I am thinking of doing it because I am in so much pain and just want it to stop!

Chris said...

There is a lot of great information here. It sounds like cortisone shots are not the best solution, even for short term pain relief. I developed a neuroma by wearing tight biking shoes with inadequate padding. I am doing a bike race in a week and am trying to get my foot to a place where it can make the distance. Any suggestions on short term pain reduction strategies to get me through the weekend race? I plan to take lots of time off after the race to recover.

Anonymous said...

Rick,

What a great website! Now, here is my story. I had my Morton's Neuroma removed surgically in 1994.
I went through all of the symptoms and pain (severe) listed in your other postings. First, the podiatrist just shaved off some calluses. Next, orthotics. Next, cortisone injections. Nothing lasted more than a few days. Then, my podiatrist told me about toes being numb, and that the neuroma may return. I said operate! Could not stand it any more and I had to work. Was on disability for 1 month. Back to work and no pain at all.

Here it is 12 years later, and up until about a year ago things were fine. Did not mind the numbness. I now have symptoms again, but nothing like before and seems to be in a slightly different spot, but have been diagnosed with a peripheral neuropathy (CMT or Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease. Nothing to do with teeth - is a French name. This is another condition about which it is difficult to find information. Called the CMT group in Chester, PA and they sent me everything one needs to know about CMT.

Thanks for all your research and information.
Jane C.

woodtrnrfh said...

I suggest suffering with and trying to control the pain. I had
neuroma surgery on both feet 3 years ago and the now nerve pain is worse than the neuroma pain.

The pain now is there 24 hours a day. I have tried many external
and internal ways to lessen the pain with no success.

Anonymous said...

As for running shoes, New Balance makes a running shoe specifically for neuroma patients. I have done a lot of internet research myself. Based on everything I read, I diagnosed myself with a morton's neuroma many months ago and finally went to the doctor yesterday. I was terrified, but I got the cortisone shot because the x-ray showed the neuroma had altered the proper position of my bones. I have had some relief and I hope it continues to provide relief. I am such a baby, but it really did not hurt after all. It contained anelgesic and the doctor told me it would sting for a second or two until the numbing agent took affect and he was right. He injected it very slowly, but it only hurt for a second. As you all understand, I am frustrated that there seems to be no real help out there. My pain is with every single step. I have shifted the way that I walk so that my big toe is pointed down to absorb the shock. I am trying to take it easy on the foot for a few days with high hopes for the injection. Fingers crossed...

Susan said...

Just got home from my first injection, (cortisone), and I wanted to post my experience. I had read prior posts and was terrified that the shot would be very painful. I almost didn't go through with it.
Anyway, my doctor used a spray that was very cold before administering the shot and it really wasn't a big deal at all. No more painful than a regular injection. So, take heart, it's not so bad. Of course I won't know the result for a day or two, but it was worth a try.
Avoiding any surgical procedure when practical is my mantra. If it doesn't work, we'll try one or two more shots and then I'll give in to the surgery. No one should have to walk around like this. It's downright miserable!
One other note, I have two neuromas in the right foot and they are quite acute. I used to be able to wear shoes with wide toe boxes, you know, "five toe" shoes as opposed to dress shoes made for people who evidently have only three toes. I used Danskos, Merrils, Birkenstocks, Asics, Easy Spitit, Naturalizer etc. As the condition worsened, I had pain from even those carefully selected (and expensive) shoes. Anyway, if you are suffering now, get yourself a pair of Crocs. I dont work for them, but I am their biggest fan. For less than 40 bucks, you can wear them forever and never even know you have a neuroma. They have saved my life and enable me to keep working and playing. I even wear them on the eliptical when I work out. They now make a tyle like the original without the holes so you can wear them in rain and cold weather. And, you can get them in "normal" colors like browm, khaki, and black. Of course, even those don't go well with a cocktail dress, but hopefully I'll get this thing under control enough to cheat and wear heels on special occasions.
Hope I've taken some of the fear of the shot away as well as given the suffering masses a way to get on with your life pain free until you're healed! Good luck- I'll post again with the outcome of the shot in a few days.

Casey said...

Especially to Jane C. who wrote about morton's neuromas and charcot marie tooth disease back on March 3, 2006-

I also have CMT. I had beuromas surgically removed from both feet two years ago. they areback with a vengeance. The one on the right is nearly as big as the whole ball of my foot and I can barely walk. I'm a high school swim coach. I am online tonight to see if there is any new treatment. My podiatrist is telling me I have to get a wheelchair and I finally agree. However, i will still have to have this removed.

I understand that I have the neuromas because of the foot deformities from the CMT. I am especially intrested in hearing from you or anyone who has both problems.

How have things turnd out for you?

Deni (Casey is my son.)

susan said...

Well, I promised to update you on the result of the shot(s). First let me tell you the second round of shots were more painful than the first. Not unbearable but really no fun at all. The next two days were hard because both feet were swollen and very sore. Third day, neuromas were doing their thing in both feet, business as usual.
I passed on tne next round of shots and scheduled myself for surgery on the right foot. There are two neuromas there. Thay can only remove one, so we're going for the one which is the most common and obvious, between the third and fourth toe ( as in "this little piggy had roast beef, and this little piggy had none").
I need to make arrangements to run my business and my family during the recovery period. My doctor want's me off the foot for two weeks until the stitches come out. They're going through the top of the foot.
I wondered if anyone out there who's had the surgery could tell mme what to expect post op, and how incapacited you were and for how long?
I have about six weeks to get my ducks in a row and it'll be much easier to make a plan if I know what to expect.
Thanks for any advice in advance.

james said...

I had my first steroid shot about a month ago. It really helped for a while but i'm a rower so have been exercising on it non-stop since. I have competed in four long races since and the pain didnt reoccur. However,as soon as I went on my first jog the pain came back and even walking far seems to make it worse! The tingling sensation is starting to come back on my toes and i'm getting really worried. I have been wearing orthotics and padding AND wide fitting new balance trainers so am guessing i'm doomed. Sounds like surgery it is. One thing I must say is that there seems to be a lot of negative stories on this discussion board. I thought maybe this was because all the people searching the web were those who were seeking further help and are more likely to not be cured. Anyone out there had ANY successful treatment? Or am I stuck with this nuisance for life?

Anonymous said...

I have had Morton’s Neuromas in both feet for about ten years. I did the whole nine yards, shots, orthodics, no relief and they get progressively more painful. There was also an electrical device that I wore on my leg with stick-on electrodes above the neuroma. It was supposed to mask the pain. What it actually did was apply a small pulsed electrical shock, which didn’t help the pain, but was annoying and took my mind off the pain occasionally. My sister has the same problem, but she had the neuromas removed, which she regrets because they came back within a few months and are worse. I have heard of two methods besides removal, one is to inject a type of alcohol into the offending nerves and kill the nerves. The other is to cut the tendons of the toes on either side of the neuroma to give the neuroma more room. Cutting tendons makes no sense to me, because the neuroma will grow to fill the space. My right foot feels like it is going to explode sometimes because the neuroma has grown so. I have decided to live with the pain, it is non-stop, but I have read too many horror stories on-line about removal. The outcome of any of these fixes is going to be different for different people, but I’m not going for anything that is irreversible, it could be worse.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I have just been diagnosed with Morton's neuroma. The podiatrist wanted to give me an injection on my first visit. I had sone just a little bit of reading and I said timeout ... need to think about this. Based upon the less-than-encouraging feedback on this site, I am glad I declined the shot.

I have a couple questions: Has anyone tried physical therapy for MN? Has anyone gained relief by loosing a significant amount of weight.

BTW I learned my sister also has MN and she has gotten significant relief from orthotics and good shoes. She can walk 4 miles at a time and be pretty much unhindered when using good footware.

Rick,

Thanks for hosting this forum.

Dennis

Anonymous said...

Hi everybody,
I just wanted to pass on my experience about Morton's. I developed the condition while training for a marathon. I went thru steroid shots and orthotics, they both helped but the pain never went away and returned as soon as I started walking any distance over 1 mile or running. My podiatrist recommended surgery but I had heard alot of bad things about it so I went looking for someone who did the alcohol shots. I started them about 2 months ago. The first two injections seemed to make the condition slightly worse, but my dr. said that was normal because the alcohol irritates the nerve (I'd be irritated too if somebody was trying to kill me with alcohol). The third shot made a HUGE difference, the pain was actually much less than before. The next two shots have helped even more. I'm not totally pain free yet and my dr. wants to wait 3 more weeks before we decide whether or not to do any more. It does take time for the alcohol to do all the damage to the nerve. I am hopeful I'm all finished with the shots and this condition. I would recommend these shots without reserve! Keep in mind that it could take weeks for the shots to start helping, but surgery has a 3-4 week recovery period and possible complications. Good luck to all!

John and /or Joann said...

I am sitting her with my elevated foot following surgery on my neuroma. I had one taken out of my left foot 20 years ago and it was great, relieving all symptoms. It was the largest one the podiatrist had ever seen. I could see the bump on the top of my foot. I have been hiking for years since then. This right foot one came with different symptoms and it has taken me years to get a Dr. to believe me that it is a neuroma. I, of course tried all of the non invasive things..the pads and shoes etc. I let a podiatrist talk me into the worthless alcohol injections.. And finally went to a surgeon and had the thing removed. He said it was big and ugly! I feel like writing "I told you so" letters to a few people! I am just a week post op and have had no pain. I limp around as it is tender still. Now I suspect I may have one between the 2nd and 3rd toes on the left foot and came upon this site as I was researching the possibility that all neuromas are not between the 3rd and 4th toes. I have not been able to get much information in this search! I am continually amazed at how much the patient has to do for ourselves in the research and diagnosing of our symptoms.. the web is a big help, but I agree with Mona that we need more reliable consumer health libraries. Webmd has been good for many things as is Mayo clinic. There are so many sites for neuroma with so little information .. right now I just want to find out about post op care of stitches since I am concerned about putting on some antibiotic cream.. can't find the answer to that either. Take an aspirin and go to bed.. maybe it will be better in the morning, right?

Anonymous said...

I had mortons neuroma surgery 10 years ago. I was a dance teacher and had horrible pain. Surgery was a Godsend. Now, however, I am starting to have sparks of numbness in my toes. It isn't what I call painful, just an annoyance. I don't want to go to the food doc unless I have to, because more than likely it would end in an ijection. No thanks!

Anonymous said...

Just had my second cotizone injection in 6 weeks. Felt absolutly no pain during or after the injection. I think it may depend on the skill of the doctor giving the injection. Slow seems to be the answer. 1st injection provided relief for only 3 days. If this second shot wears off then next step is orthotics.

nkp said...

I would just like to hear that someone out there has gotten all of the alcohol injections and a time lapse of at least 2 to 10 years has gone by and blog your results after all those years. I can't find anyone who has gone thru this procedure and told their results. Can someone help?

Beth said...

It has been almost nine years since I started having pain in my feet. I have lived in 4 different states (5 different towns) and had just as many podiatrists/foot doctors, whatever you want to call them, and it still took 6 years before I got a diagnoses of two neuromas in each foot (one Morton's, one unnamed). Before that I tried everything: foot pads, physical therapy (every type from ice to heat to exercise, you name it), 6 different types of orthotics, every type shoe imaginable, and cortisone injections in two different states. One doctor told me I was too fat (wanted to slug him-didn't), I lost 50 pounds, down to 135, it didn't help (helped the rest of my body, just not my feet). The doctor who finally diagnosed the neuromas with an MRI told me he didn't know what to do for me, and said I should do internet research. Went to another doctor who put me on Neurontin, a drug that is for epileptics, but is known to help nerve pain. I gained 20 lbs. in a month, but after going up in dosage 3 times, it seemed to help the pain, it didn't make the pain go away, it just helped. But it made me so so tired all the time and pretty lethargic, and I was going to have to go up in dosage again, so I told the doctor I couldn't take it anymore and he tapered me off of it. Several months later I went to another specialist since that one retired. I ended up having the tendon cut between the 2nd and 3rd toes on each foot. The idea was to open the area between the toes so the nerve could sit between the bones instead of being crushed under the bones. Ten months later I know the surgery did nothing to help the pain. It added to it because now I have pain at the surgery sites. We moved to another state, so I went to another doctor. This one thinks there is a muscular skeletal problem instead of neuromas. He said the most mistaken diagnosis for pain in the feet is neuroma. So he gave me a steroid injection in my left foot in the same basic area as the surgery to see if we can rule out muscular skeletal problems. And the saga continues. . . One piece of advice I can give you is about shoes. The absolute best shoes in the USA for sure are Spira shoes. They are made in El Paso, TX and started out as Shoe Spring shoes. (The name was recently changed.) Check out the website at spirafootwear.com. The shoes I use are walking shoes with 2 springs in the front and 1 spring in the back. I read that their running shoes were banned in some running events because they give the runners an unfair advantage. I don't care about that since I'm not a runner. All I care about is that they are the only shoes I can wear except for Birkenstocks (which I use for around the house when I'm tired of athletic shoes). Hope this helps someone.

Anonymous said...

I've suffered with morton neuroma since 2004. The only treatment I have had is deep massage and ultrasound. I visited the podiatrist again yesterday (late 2007) and he recommended that I not do any injections with my current symtoms. He seems to think that its better I live with some soreness and pain that try any intrusive therapy (like injections),

At the beginning the neuroma was painful. Now the condition is rarely painful, but my one foot is often sore and feels weak. I think I have compensated by using the other foot more often. The podiatrists opinion is that this is something I need to manage for a long time, maybe the rest of my life. He suggests that I stop running so I'll try that for a few months. Based on some of the comments I have read on this site I can be thankful that my condition is not worse considering I have abused my feet for a bunch of years ... I try to treat them better now. I find that if my foot is sore I soak it in cold water with ice cubes and it helps.

I've bookmarked this site and will check back and add further comments. Take care of your feet.

Dan

heidi said...

This website is interesting, to say the least. I can identify with many of the experiences of others with a diagnosis of morton's neuroma. I was surprised that no one mentioned acupuncture. I've been receiving acupuncture treatments for about 5 months with progressively good results. The philosophy behind the treatments is to help the body heal itself. I had a huge setback after seeing a podiatrist three weeks ago. She prescribed orthotics, which I am game to try, but also gave me a cortisone injection. After the 1st day of tenderness mixed with numbness from the injection, I had a week free from pain. Then the pain came back almost worse than ever(I've suffered with symptoms for a year) and now the pain is constant and severe.

Anonymous said...

I have Mortons as well and wanted to stay away from shots and surgery, however one night pain was not letting me sleep, and I tried rolling a piece of tishue and placing it between my 3rd and 4th toe, INCREDIBLY pain was almost gone inmediately! this also after a couple of weeks on advil! I secured the tishue with a couple of bandaids! after a few days, I could take off the funny looking fix... Now I have discovered Crocs! WOW, I{m back to normal walking with them!

Melinda said...

A friend of mine noticed my limp and asked what was wrong. I explained that I had Morton's Neuromas and since cortisone shots had failed, my doctor was urging me to have surgery. My friend told me he had had Morton's and was able to cure it by doing a yoga move where you spread your toes and then place your fingers between your toes and massage for 10 minutes twice a day. He said this opened the tight spaces that were pinching the nerves. I tried this exercise plus added my own brilliant idea of wearing a foam pedicure toe separator 24/7 for a few weeks. My pain and swelling have disappeared. (For the gentlemen, you can purchase toe separators from any beauty supply store or nail websites like www.enailsupply.com). Everyday I keep expecting the pain to come back, but so far, it hasn't and it’s been six weeks.

Anne said...

Rick- you said you would stick to bicycling instead of running- be careful, that is how I developed my Mortons (I think.) I had been going to "Spinning" classes at the YMCA for a couple of months when it first presented- seems logical since the spinning pedal strap tightens the bones in the upper foot while full body weight is applied to the ball of the foot.
At any rate this has been a nightmare- like the above posts- I have tried the steroid shots (just one- horrible pain for 48 hrs and then back to "normal" pain immediately. Went to a chiropractor using Active Release Therapy (ART) first session relieved pain for three days- next session for only 3 hours. Tried a different Podiatrist and am now getting the alcohol shots- only had the first- helped for a few days them pain returned- scheduled for the second one in 5 days. ( Does anyone know why they need to be given 10 days apart??)
I have recently heard about and am tring to research Cyrosurgery- which "Freezes" the nerve with a minimally invasive procedure. Like the rest of you- I am very scared of trying traditional surgey based on the results I've read about.
This damn thing just HURTS - I can't live like this- I am an active mom with two school age kids. I had to learn to drive with my left foot while my right foot is on an ice bag!

ANYbody know anything about cryosurgery?

Ruth said...

I have fought Morton's Neuroma for 3 years.
My first encounter with a Podiatrist evaluated correctly and I was given a cortizone/steriod injection in the bottom of the foot.
I walked out pain free and continued pain free for nearly eight months. I rec'd a second injection which lasted only about four months.
The third injection he went through the top of the foot which lasted only a few weeks.
The fourth injection lasted about three months.
My injections were not on a whim. I waited several months after the effects wore off because I knew I was pushing the envelope getting the third and fourth injection.
I'm now at the stage of surgery.
I consulted with an Orthopedic Dr as well a my Podiatrist. They were both in agreement with the nerve removal.
However my delima now is the Podiatrist wants to release the tendon in my leg as he says I have a range of mobility that is only about 3 percent.
The Orthopedic Dr says no tendon release.
I don't want more surgery than necessary, yet don't want it to be half done.
Truth be know I want no surgery.
Ruth

Anonymous said...

Hi Everyone. I've had a Morton’s Neuroma for 4 years now. I've been treated with orthotics, cortisone injections, alcohol injections and surgery twice, but nothing has relieved the pain. I recently got a third opinion and this Podiatrist who is recommending "Cryogenic freezing". This a procedure where a probe is inserted into your foot and used to "freeze" the affected area in an effort to reduce the inflammation and allow the so called nerve "stump" to retract from in between the bones. Does any one have experience with this procedure? Has any found a sure fire cure for a Morton's neuroma?????

Anonymous said...

YES!! I had this procedure performed on December 11th. It was incrediblely simple. The Podiatrist who performed the procedure numbed my foot, then inserted a needle with the cryogenic probe- it stayed in my foot for 6 minutes, then went into a "defrost mode" for 30 seconds before the doctor removed the probe. I felt zero pain during the procedure and chatted with the doctor and a medical student who came in to watch. Afterwards he recomended keeping the area iced (30 min on, 30 min off)for the remainder of the day and staying off the foot as much as possible that day and the next. I followed his instructions and had virtually no swelling. Day 3 I was back full speed, moved into a new home the following week- carrying gazillions of boxes- no pain- no problems. I am VERY VERY happy about the procedure. I was in awful and almost constant pain prior to the procedure- and did not want to consider traditional surgery due to the results I have read about.
I hope you have the same level of sucess!
NOTE: The machine used is expensive $30k plus so not many Podiatrists have one. Pain Mgt doctors frequently have them for back pain- but getting a quick appointment is extremely difficult and the foot is really not their area of expertise- I would look for a Podiatrist trained in the procedure with the equipment in his office. I had to travel out of town to get mine done. It has only been performed in the United States for the past three years, but has been used in Europe much longer. Long term results are not really known- but my podiatrist has not had anyone tell him of a recurrance yet.

Anonymous said...

Ruth- there is another option- many Poditrists are apparently unaware of it. Find out about Cryosurgery- which freezes the nerve. The is almost no downtime, results are immediate, and I have not heard of any risks with the procedure. Mine was a complete sucess. I have no pain, and no noticable numbness either. Look into it before you go the surgery route!

Anonymous said...

PLEASE I HOPE ALL OF YOU READ THIS...I HAD MY MN RELIEVED BY THE MOST UNBELIEVABLE SIMPLE TREATMENT LAST WEEK!!! It's called "Cold Laser Therapy". I had it done in a chiropractor's office. It took all of 5 minutes...ABSOLUTELY no pain & I'm about 80% better!!! I will go back for another treatment to hopefully be 100% better. Basically the instrument looks like a little flashlight & uses a cold laser instead of hot...it is put on the area for 5 minutes...you don't feel a thing. The next day my foot got worse but after that its been getting better everyday & it has been only 6 days. Please I URGE all of you to find a practioner in your area who uses this cutting edge treatment to get rid of this misery MN from your life!!!

CorkieJean said...

As most of you I've suffered Morton's Neuroma now for several years. I had the surgery, now am just dealing with the damage from the surgery. They took the fatty pad from the ball of my foot, now I walk on bone and skin. One doctor says the neuroma has returned another says no it hasn't. One says I should have been in orthonics since the surgery, one says no. Oh and I have another foot issue, Plantar Faciitis (same foot the other damage is in). What I do for one issue irritates the other issue. One doctor says do surgery again, one says no. Looking for doctor #3 to see what this one says. CROCS do NOT help mine, I'm walking on bone. Making it "feel" better doesn't help. Stopping what irritates it, helps. Go to any beauty supply store get toe separators that helps take pressure off the bones. Nerve Damage needs to be taken care of EARLY and needs Neuro Massage Therapy NOT surgery. Hindsight is 20/20.

CorkieJean said...

Oh and SOFTER than Crocs. Marlin's (found on line, Marlins flip flops) or at sporting goods stores) they are tight celled sponge on the bottom, like walking on air.

Scott said...

I do a lot of hiking and have developed two neuromas because of putting a set of cushioned insoles in a pair of hiking boots, which has caused a neuroma twice now between my big toe. I had the first one about a year ago, Which luckily went after about a month of absolute rest, which I was very serious about as I had read that surgery is most likely with them.

Anyway, I changed the insoles when I started using the boots again and put the problem down to the boots being new. I carried on hiking for a year, no problem, but then recently noticed a new neuroma forming. The problem is that the boots can be a narrow fit at the toes.

I only once briefly felt pain with a neuroma, but its been nearly two months now with this second one and I'm starting to think the pain comes next! So I'd be really interested to know what the usual time is for a neuroma to go away on its own?

Runner Chick said...

I am a runner and developed Mortons Neuroma while training for a marathon. That was two years ago and the I have tried cortisone and alcohol injections and the pain is worse than when I started. I have had 4 shots and the Pod says we should wait a month and then if there isn't any improvement try the Cryosurgery. Any suggestions??

Anonymous said...

To Runner chick,
The cryo surgery is non-evasive (it is just like getting a shot but lasts a couple of minutes. It is not painful, the recovery time is minimal ( my Dr. suggested icing my foot 30 min on, 30 min off for the first day and staying off the foot to prevent swelling from the shot.) And the result is just fantastic. My insurance covered the procedure and I found a Poditrist with the equipment and experience to perform the procedure. I went from not being able to walk without pain to pain free overnight. That was 3 months ago and so far everything is still great.
I would highly recommend this as your next step based on my results.

Anonymous said...

I have this too and got my first steriod shot in October. I was alergic to the shot so now (March) I am trying the alcohol shots to deaden the nerve I am told. I had the first shot last nite and today it burns and hurts worse. The Pod seems to know what he is talking about and I am told a series of 7 shots (1 each week) will deaden this nerve. I am a skier, biker and can't deal with this. Any comments on alchol shots working for them or not?

JANIE said...

Hi, I am going through the same thing as everyone else. I been dealing with this about 2 years now. I did not know what was happening to my feet. I started feeling very uncomfortable in my shoe and could not understand what was happening. It felt like the balls of my feet would not sit right in my shoes as if the skin or cushion of my feet were bunched up. I stopped wearing shoes and lived in diesels and sneekers. I also started to limp because of the pain I had when I step down with the ball of my foot. I just figured I hurt myself. I stood like this for about a year before I went to a foot doctor. The doctor knew right away what it was. I did not know anything about MN and he didn't make a big deal about it. He gave me a cortazone shot which hurt about 15 to 20 minutes after it was given. It only lasted about a week. I looked it up online and read and let me tell you it does not look good for us. I never went back to the doctor until a year later. I went skiing with my family and my neuroma decided to really act up and I never got to ski. When I got home I made an appointment with a different foot doctor and he agreed that it was MN and I went for an MRI because I wanted to be sure in case I make any decisions. During the time I did not do anything about my MN I was not in great pain but very uncomfotable. I still could not wear shoes, I felt the nerve pop up and down, shock when I step down and also numbness in my toes. This is very uncomfortabe. I love shoes and always wore comfortable shoes. I don't know how I got this and I do know I have one in my other foot just as long as the first one but not as bad. I want it to be gone. I really am depressed over this and I cry. I can't imagine there is no cure for this. Can't they correct the bones so it doesn't pinch the nerves. I don't feel like trying all these things people have tried and are unsucessful it sounds like a wasted of time. The freezing sounds like something I will look into. Surgery sound like a great relief for the moment but hell later on. What do we do! I am glad I found you guys and the site gave me alot of info. Please excuse my spellin errors

Anonymous said...

According to Dr. Marc Katz (podiatrist in Tampa), cortisone is temporary, but a new cryosurgical technique (basically the injection of liquid nitrogen into the point of the neuroma) will permanently remove the neuroma without making an incision. See the video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fqalM4EjVE I've got Morton's neuroma, made much worse by a careless podiatrist, and I will go to great lengths to avoid surgery or even cortisone.

Sara said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

I have been dealing with Mortons for over a year and a half and just recently gave in and had the surgery. Its only been about 6 weeks, but so far it has only cut the discomfort in half. I highly recommend CROCS if you are dealing with the sensation of a rock in your shoe. The material forms to your foot as it heats up and I feel very little to NO pain. They come in all sorts of styles now, not just the ones that look like gardening shoes :)
Best of Luck to all of you

Michelle said...

I am 25 years old and believe I have Morton's Neuroma. It started four months ago. On and off I would get unbearable pain in my right foot, right where the ball is. Now, I have incredible pain on a daily basis. When I went to the doctor she told me it was some kind of tumor (I can't remember the name of it), said to wear proper shoes and if it didn't go away she could give me a cortisone shot. Ahhh!! After reading everyone's posts, I feel like there is nothing I can do! I have tried flat, comfortable shoes and it seems everytime I put any pressure on my foot, it hurts. It has also affected the way I walk and the right side of my body seems off-balance. I read on a previous post about some yoga/massage technique. Does anyone have any other ideas or alternative therapy's that they suggest? I feel like this is never going to go away! I am on my feet ALL THE TIME and cant afford surgery or expensive treatments because I do not have health insurance...HELP!

Anonymous said...

Michelle, find a poditrist who can perform cyro-surgery. It is not really surgery- it is a shot that injects a freezing substance that kills the nerve. The procedure takes 6 minutes. The recovery time is about two days of limited walking on the foot with ice packs to prevent swelling.

It is absolutely a miracle- I went from excruciating constant pain to practically pain free instantly after the shot/procdure. The other shots and massage therapy and crap I tried and paid big $$$ for did not help at all- and like you I did not want surgery.
Anne

Anonymous said...

I have Morton's neuromas in both feet. The best thing I have done is buy Cloud 9 Crocs, specifically made for foot problems. I wear them as much as I can, and they have helped a lot. Also, when I'm having problems, I ice the balls of my feet a couple of times a day, and that helps, too.

Anonymous said...

I have been diagnosed with MN. It's not the pain that bothers me so much . . . it's how my feet look. I used to love wearing sandals. Now, the huge space between by third and fourth toes on both feet looks terrible! Is there anything that will bring my feet back to normal?

Anonymous said...

I am a 20 year old male and I play competitive Ultimate. I haven't previously had any significant foot problems, but after a tournament this summer ('08) I had excruciating pain when my metatarsals were pushed together. I rested it for a month, then started playing again with very little discomfort. Several weeks later I was sprinting and felt it "come back".

My doctor is quite sure it's a neuroma, but the typical symptoms sound more gradual. Has anyone heard of sudden and severe MN?

Anonymous said...

Yep! Mine was VERY sudden. I had taken up "spinning" at the gym and was doing this 4-5 times a week wearing regular running shoes instead of the expensive spinning shoes which attach to the bike pedal. One day my foot just began to hurt intensely- I went through many weeks of pain trying various things and finally resolved it with cryosurgery. It is 95% better now.

Anonymous said...

As a Morton's Neuroma sufferer for many years I've tried several things, two doctors. Custom orthotics help in good tennis shoes - Brooks Asics work well for me. Chacos sandals have a great arch support, Naot shoes are so supportive (and quite expensive) that I don't have to wear my orthotics in them although they do have removable insoles so that you can put orthotics in them. Any pair that I've bought I've been able to wear without orthotics. Haflinger boiled wool slippers with cork soles are so supportive, taking pressure off the nerve that I sometimes wear them to work in the winter. They just look like clogs. They are what I wear around the house. The shoes are all expensive but I want to be able to walk. Thanks to the person suggesting something between the 3rd and 4th toes - I just rolled up a kleenex and yes, it really helps. My pain is constant, even when sitting or lying down. I'll get the toe separators next.

Anonymous said...

I lived with pain and cortisone shots for a year in regards to my Morton's Neuroma. I finally succumbed to surgery which helped, (for a while). I did have pain from scar tissue and numbness, and now have another very painful neuroma in the same place, (just a little over but still between the second and third toe). Surgery takes away the swollen tissue but does not solve the problem of the joints being close together. Like Melinda above, I have found yoga to be extremely helpful as one tries to stretch and spread your toes out when standing, thus making more room between the joints. It is the closest thing to a cure I have found. I got relief in the past but turned to surgery because I thought that was a permanent solution. Now I have taken it up again and realize that I must stick with it for relief. But it must be done consistently or the pain comes back as the joints get closer together again. I have found much relief by buying "yoga toes" which separate the toes. they also help people with bunyons. I also pad my arch but not the ball of the foot. Padding the ball of the foot puts more pressure on the neuroma, but padding the instep takes some of the pressure off the ball of the foot. Also get sneakers that have a stiffer sole rather than ones that are flexible at the ball of the foot area. I used to do the elliptical machine at the gym but found that that aggravated my foot so I switched to the treadmill and that seems to be less pressure on my foot. I had hard insoles made to fit in my sneakers, and flexible insoles that I can slip into my high heals which help a lot and take pressure off the ball of my foot. So, you can find great relief with "yoga toes", a yoga practice, stiffer soled sneakers, and pads for the arches not the balls of your feet. Good luck everyone!

Anonymous said...

changed runnng shoe that now has wide toe box and good cushioning (asics kayano). went 1/2 size larger than my normal size. made a world of difference during and after workout. pain from neuroma greatly reduced, now it's just a minor nuisance. icing and massaging foot has helped. i hate to make this suggestion, but i think it's relevant: being overweight can make neuroma pain worse...try dropping wt if overweight.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for creating this site and to all who have shared thier stories. I am on my 4th year of having MN in my right foot. I had a total of 3 Cortisone shots 3yrs ago, which did help for a couple of years. Yes, they were painful but I did not want surgery. Now over this last year my foot is getting worse, I will have to make a decision about the next treatment. The postings here have given me some new insight and ideas. I walk 2&1/2 miles a day and can't bear the thought of giving that up.
Good Luck to all and thank you.
Deborah

Anonymous said...

I was diagnosed with Morton's Neuroma about 5 months ago but have been dealing with the symptoms for well over a year. My podiatrist has given me pads to put in my shoes, I haven't worn high heals in months, and I've had to stop running. Because nothing else has worked, my doctor gave me my first cortisone injection a couple of months ago. I know everyone is different, but for me, that shot was incredibly painful. I had to go to work after my appointment but was in so much pain from the shot, which was on my right foot, I could barely drive. By the end of the day, my foot was so swollen that I couldn't move my toes. Even with diligent icing, the swelling didn't go down for almost a week; I couldn't wear a shoe on that foot and I couldn't drive. After recovering from the shot itself, the pain returned and my foot felt exactly the same. Has anyone else had that kind of reaction to a cortisone injection?

Anonymous said...

i was diagnosed with a neuroma just today, after an mri of the foot. i went to the podiatrist this morning, and he injected cortisone into the top of the foot, using the freezing spray everyone has mentioned. 12 hours after the shot, i am pain free. it did hurt badly in the 2 hours just after the shot. burned, and felt awful. within a few hours, that went away and now i cannot feel a thing.

Anonymous said...

About 3 weeks ago I started having sudden and intermittent electric shocks in my left foot. Extremely painful, very erratic, and would go away as suddenly as it came on. Was diagnosed with Morton's Neuroma 2 days ago by podiatrist. Had the cortisone cocktail mix shot, both on top and bottom of foot. I have continued to have electric shocks in this foot, and now the bottom of my foot is swollen from the injection, and hard to walk on. Has anyone had this experience, and how long did it take for it to go down? The padding on the ball of my foot is swollen and a little numb.

I'm a tennis player, biker (little did I know that the foot pain I was getting in my bike shoes was MN). After reading all the posts, it sounds like cryogenic surgery is the way to go. I'm not sure I'll continue with these injections, especially given the side effects. This is a very informative site-- thanks

Anonymous said...

I had the surgery to remove the nerve end about 10 years ago. That foot is absolutely fine! (Yes, there is some numbness in the toe tips, but it requires searching to find it.) Recovery was not as bad as I had predicted. I must admit that now that my other foot has gone south, I would love something simpler, but know that surgery does work.

Cecile said...

I have had this pain in the ball of my foot and 4 toes for over 4 years and it's gotten much worse and more frequent during the last year. I went to Temple's Foot & Ankle clinic and after ultra sound, x-rays and an MRI, was diagnosed with a neuroma in 2nd interspace. They told me surgery only 50-50 success. Cryosurgery MAY be an option later. On their recommendation, I'm trying UltraSound therapy, exercise and massage for a month. I've had 3 sessions so far. I'll let you know how it goes. My point for writing is to let you know what I've tried for relief and prevention.
Actually, "relief" is almost non-existant, once the pain starts, there IS NO relief - it just has to run its course, which can be 10-12 hours. However, I feel that I have been moderately successful in prevention. If I'm going to be on my feet (cooking, for example) I use a 2-3" THICK piece of foam cushion, UNDER the ball of my foot - not ON the ball - secured with one of those stretch ace bandage things. This apparently takes the pressure off the ball. When you don't have the pain, it's easy to foget about preventing it, so I have to make sure to keep myself aware of keeping that pressure off my bad foot, by resting the instep or heel on the bottom of an open cabinet while standing or just resting it on the heel on the floor. The thick foam cushion is compressed by the ace bandage, and compresses more if I need to walk around, and doesn't interfere with my walking at all. Around the house, I am either barefoot or in slippers. I sometimes also use the 'pedicure pads', just to increase my chances of success. I'll need to try this for at least a week or 2 to determine if it really works, but I am convinced that until a 'permanent' procedure can be done, prevention is the key, and I'm the only one who can do that.

Ed said...

Hello to everyone,

Have you had any experience with the acupuncture tecnique in the treatment of Morton's Neuroma or intermetatarsal compression neuritis?
If so, have they been positive?

Best regards, and soon recovery to all of you.

Ed

Sadie said...

THis is the greatest source of genuinely helpful information I have found in my three years of trolling the internet for neuroma solutions. THanks so much to all of you.
I have three morton's neuromas in my right foot, diagnosed by ultrasound, and at least one now in my left foot as well. It seems more like a ganglia of them on the left, under the ball. The ones in the right are between 3 and 4 ("impressive"), between 2 and 3, and on the outside of the right ball. That one only bothers me when I wear Birkenstocks, actually, because of the cupping of the outer foot.
I started feeling the biggest one first, between 3 and 4, as a bee bee popping up between my metatarsal heads when I stepped. Over the last three years since it began I have developed more and the pain has increased. i, too, have some space between the toes now. I have had three cortisone shots and they got worse almost immediately after. There is also wasting of the tissue in the area as well, so they are not good for long term (or even more than 1 I would say).
My Drs told me to steer clear of the alcohol shots for a similar reason. THey said it is quite destructive.
I am not a candidate for surgery since i have so many and they all really bother me. So Cryo is perhaps worth looking into. I do love my special Crocs for neuromas. You can find them on the site by searching for Morton's Neuroma. They are slightly larger than regular crocs, but puppies seem to like them just as much. :-)
No other shoes quite work but there are some shoes that aren't to bad for short wear if they land most of my weight on the big ball behind my big toe. Soft shoes don't help me at all except for croc cloud 9 and croc flip flops so far. I have bought so many special shoes! We should all get together and try each other's shoes on before we buy all this stuff.
Metatarsal pads are horrible for me because they just make my neuromas pop, no matter how well they are placed.

So I have a cane that I use for events where i need to stand a lot like museums and parties. It also helps me because I am only 38, look young and healthy and people don't quite understand how much it hurt me to stand and walk. It gives people a visual reminder to help me find a chair or to not expect me to walk with them instead of taking a car.

I have gained weight because I don't exercise as much, so that is really hard. I have always been a really attractive woman who didn't have to do much to stay slim. Now my metabolism has slowed down and I have such a hard time with that.

I can walk comfortable on certain beaches! Does anyone else have this experience? If it is a lumpy, slopey beach as opposed to a flat, packed beach, my foot spreads out and molds around the sand. I took two trips to Jupiter, FL this winter largely because they have the perfect walking beach for neuromas. I might have to consider moving.

I can do yoga and Tai Chi except for a few things that require more balance than I have. I can't do any exercise that requires shoes.

What I'd like to know is :
if acupuncture has worked for people

if the cold laser has worked for anyone else besides that one person who posted

And if anyone has had the cryo treatment on multiple neuromas. Does it cause death of the nerve or just part of it?

Please respond directly to me if you have any answers as well as posting here. I'm desperate!

sadie@essenceofhealing.com

Anonymous said...

I have had a Morton's neuroma since I was 25, and am now 50. I have had intermittent cortisone shots since the diagnosis. It seems that I would go through a period of minimal pain and then it would come back with a vengance. Last year, dealing with a fresh bout of pain, I tried alcohol sclerosing injections, which did not help at all.

After the failure of the alcohol injections I was kind of just meandering through, trying to make the best of things when last fall a new, unrelenting form of pain in the arch and sides of my big toes nearly left hobbled. It started on one foot and resolved, and then it started on the other foot. I believe that pain was from bunions.

Anyhow, back to Morton's neuroma. With the pain so great from the bunion problem, I began seeing a new podiatrist. The bunion pain in the second foot resolved but the neuroma pain resurfaced, with a vengance.

Last week I had my second cortisone injection. I am hoping for enough relief that I can walk a normal amount again. It takes (for me) a good month (at this point) for the injection to really do its work, and in fact, nearly seems like it generates its own bit of pain before the real relief kicks in.

My goal is to be able to wear closed-toe shoes once again and be able to walk at least a couple of miles. The sandals/socks thing is comfortable for a couple of hours on my feet but in the winter or wet weather it can really be a hassle. I took my son skiing and was worried about what I would wear to be able to walk around at the base of the slope. Sandals just weren't going to cut it in the snow! I realized I could wear my husband's snow boots quite well! They were kind of large looking (no couture look for me), but they worked for that occasion.

I really, really do not want to get surgery, and my newest podiatrist says that he does not recommend it. My mother had it and though she said it helped, it did not completely solve the problem.

I think everyone has different luck with different types of shoes and sandals. My best results -- at the time at which the pain is greatest -- is to go with sandals worn with socks, the thicker the sock the better! I have found Beautifeel sandals to be very comfortable, but I cannot get a good fit with them. They are Euro sized, and I need a wide width, which is hard to find in that brand. I have tried MBTs, which seemed to worsen the condition. I tried Spiras, which I think might have been good but realized only after wearing them a while that the shoes were cut short for their size. Maybe a half size up would have done it. I have spent so much on shoes that I can't afford to try it!

I need shoes with a lot of arch support and have found a Drew sandal with a rocker-type sole to be my best fit with the greatest comfort. I also have a pair of Drew heavy-duty orthopedic shoes, but with their steel shank I have found them to be too stiff and unyielding. Plus, due to the pain, for a while there I simply could not wear anything but sandals. I have also found Propet sandals to be good.

My neuroma, unlike the majority, is between my 2nd and 3rd toe. It has always taken me a great deal of convincing to get podiatrists to believe this. I also have a bursa there. All this was confirmed by a recent sonogram. Also, the foot with the neuroma is about 3/4 of a shoe size larger than the non-neuroma foot. So, you can imagine all those years the neuroma foot was probably squeezed into the wrong size. No wonder I have always been so glad for warm weather and sandals!

I think if anyone is going to try the sclerosing injections, they should get them done with a doctor who can do the procedure with guided sonography.

That's my long and dull neuroma story. I write it in case it helps anyone piece together the information they need to make their next step. Good luck to everyone.

anne said...

Please look into Cryosurgery- only a few podiatrists have the machine and training- find one!!
I had a Cryosurgery treatment 16 months ago and have been almost normal since then- I can wear any shoes except high heels. it is not really surgery at all- it is an injection which freezes the nerve- permanently numbing it. The procedure takes 6 minutes and does not hurt.

wendy said...

COLD LASER THERAPY! I have been suffering with MN for about a month...terrible, debilitating pain that came on suddenly! I stayed off my feet for over a week, ate tons of Advil, applied ice, heat....but no relief! After reading a post on this site I went to my chiropractor for a COLD LASER THERAPY session. Low and behold, it's working! It was a bit worse the day after the treatment, but today it's about 60% better (with no advil!) I'm going to continue for 2 sessions a week (just $30.00 a visit!). I'll keep you posted. PS: Crocs have also been helpful.

Anonymous said...

I've had Morton's Neuroma for about 10 years. I tried accupuncture and chiropractic adjustments, with no success. I wear orthotics, which help but don't eliminate the symptoms. I've also had a couple of cortisone shots, which gave immediate pain relief but wore off quickly. I do have a prescription from my podiatrist for anti-inflammatory medicine, and this helps when I've aggravated my neuroma. I also switched from running to skating (both quad and rollerblading). Once I got skates that could accomodate my orthotics, I found that skating puts even less pressure on my neuroma than biking does (I bike but don't wear biking shoes -- rather more structured shoes). The other thing I've found is that losing weight really makes a difference -- my neuroma hurts more if I put on weight, but when I'm fit it hurts much less and can tolerate much more -- less weight pressing down on it). I do want to get back to running some day. I just got Spira shoes (with the three-spring model, one of the springs is right under my neuroma), so we'll see if that helps. Also, roomy toe boxes are important but they won't solve everything. I never wore tight shoes, but I have a lot of structural problems with my feet so I got a neuroma anyway.

Anonymous said...

I've struggled with Morton's Neuroma for 2 years. I had Cortizone injections, alcohol injections, taken anti-inflammatory drugs. I finally gave up on the shots because they were so painful and gave little relief. I finally got cured by accident. I developed a bad case of food poisoning and ended up staying one night in the hospital. They gave me a Magnesium IV. When I got home from the hospital, I was looking for natural cures to get rid of bad bacteria in my stomach. I started taking raw organic garlic and chopping a clove up into small pieces and swallowing it like vitamins each day. I also started drinking an Ayurvedic tea which is a mixture of 1/2 teaspoon of Coriander,1/2 of Fennel Seed and 1/2 of Cumin made in a coffee maker. I'm not sure which one did it, but I woke up the next day and noticed that after two years of pain, my foot felt NORMAL! No pain--I couldn't even feel the neuroma. I kind of don't think it was the Magnesium because the neuroma was still there the next day after that. I think it was either the garlic or the tea. I've continued doing both this week, and so far I have yet to feel the neuroma pain again. I feel great!

Anonymous said...

I've struggled with Morton's Neuroma for 2 years. I had Cortizone injections, alcohol injections, taken anti-inflammatory drugs. I finally gave up on the shots because they were so painful and gave little relief. I finally got cured by accident. I developed a bad case of food poisoning and ended up staying one night in the hospital. They gave me a Magnesium IV. When I got home from the hospital, I was looking for natural cures to get rid of bad bacteria in my stomach. I started taking raw organic garlic and chopping a clove up into small pieces and swallowing it like vitamins each day. I also started drinking an Ayurvedic tea which is a mixture of 1/2 teaspoon of Coriander,1/2 of Fennel Seed and 1/2 of Cumin made in a coffee maker. I'm not sure which one did it, but I woke up the next day and noticed that after two years of pain, my foot felt NORMAL! No pain--I couldn't even feel the neuroma. I kind of don't think it was the Magnesium because the neuroma was still there the next day after that. I think it was either the garlic or the tea. I've continued doing both this week, and so far I have yet to feel the neuroma pain again. I feel great!

Chess Black said...

Message to Melinda...
I am in the UK and suffering what the doc reckons is Mortons Neuroma, worse on the right, less extreme on the left.

A keen walker and highly active person, the problem began with a nioght of excess country dancing in pumps with totally unforgiving soles. I'm slim, not overweight, 51 years, and been in pain and discomfort for 6/7 months. Your treatment of spreading the metatarsals sounds viable, as it might help unpinch the nerves, and I have bought the toe spreaders and now busy splaying them, and massaging them. I am also applying ice packs after walking when I can to reduce inflammation.

Any other tips? Did you manage to wear them inside footwear?? Most importantly have you had any symptoms since?

All the best, Chess

Anonymous said...

Prolotherapy really helps. Injection of dextrose into the neuroma to irritate the body to use its own inflammatory process to heal itself. Unbelievable releif from MN

Ronda said...

I recently started getting B-12 shots w/Lidocaine between the 2nd and 3rd toe on top of the foot. I've also started using a toe spreader and wear supportive athletic shoes with orthodics about 95% of the time. These seem to be helping right now and I'm sure losing some weight would give me some additional relief.

Anonymous said...

I have neuromas in both of my feet. Had cortizone and alcohol injections, which were basically useless. I finally found my own treatment that works so well I seldom notice the neuromas anymore. Get a tube of Topricin, (I got mine at a Health Food Store--I'm not sure if it's sold in other stores). It's an anti-inflammatory cream that is made for the foot. It cots about $17, but it's worth it, and it goes a long way. I also got a set of toe separators (which is about $1.30) at a Beauty supply store. If I'm just sitting at home watching TV, I put the toe separators between my toes and rub Topricin on both feet & keep them in for long periods of time. I also get Tumeric Powder at the Heatlh Food Store (which is a natural anti-inflammatory spice) and drink it in hot tea every day. I had pretty painful neuromas, and I barely notice them anymore.

Anonymous said...

Chess says...In repsonse to annonymous, why annonymous I wonder?? Is it because tumeric is a joke? this sounds hilarious, but I'll try it. I have just been to the hopsital and they have confirmed the neuroma and will probably give me steroid injections.. I used the toe spreaders mentioned elsewhere on the web, and I think it resulted in me getting pain in my big toe joint, which was already rather pronounced. (Age 50). So be careful of this.

L said...

wear birkenstocks whenever you can. even around the house. the support in them is perfect for neuroma. I can walk for hours with birks on....but barely with even running shoes.

novick said...

Today is the 27th October 09. I have just come across this site. My story started with a digital neuroma diagnosed by a rheumatalogist nearly 4 years ago. I was getting intermittant pain not so bad and was told that this could be sorted out by alchohol injections. I had a course via a radiologist under my private insurance. I had 4 injections with 2 week intervals. These injections worked like a dream although I do not believe the NEUROMA shrunk, however the pain went away. 4 years later I started to get back this intermittant pain. I was referred to a radiologist to have a steriod injection. Not sure why sterioid however as I was sitting infront of the specialist he told me this is what he did not alcohol. So I had this injection just one, which lasted 7 months and now there was a thinning on the top of my foot which was not there with the alcohol injections. All these past injections were administered above the foot.I went back to rheumatologist as I started again to have intermittant pain under foot.
He organised for me to see the original radiologist Dr. Connel UK for alcohol injections again.
Appparently on ultrasound screen it looked as though the neuroma was still 8 mm. However the radiologist said it now did not look like a neuroma. I stupidly did not question the doctor at the time, and just said that I did not want surgery so I guess this was the best way forward. He then gave me this first injectionn. The very next day I had a little reaction foot little swollen which had not happened previously 4 years ago. I was told to elevate the foot and put ice on it for any inflamation. I had the injection on the Monday and by the Wednesday went to my local doctor who informed me that I had a very bad infected foot and may well need IV if the antibiotics did not kick in by 2 days. Hence the antibiotics did not kick in and I ended up in hospial for 5 days with IV antibiotics. I AM now on oral antibiotics, have been bedridded for weeks unable to walk and feel ill with the strong antibiotics My foot is now after 5 days getting better. The nerve pain is very painful though. I spent 5 days in hospital and 6 days on oral antibiotics beginning to get better. However I have to now come off antibiotics. Getting deep muscle pains legs, shoulders, heavy head, etc, etc. If anyone out there has experienced this please get in touch with me. IS THERE ANY OTHER CURE FOR THIS INJECTION WHICH WENT WRONG. I believe the injection has got into the soft tissues and caused this infection. I live in the UK my email is jodienovick@hotmail.com.
I'm hoping that may be a doctor out there could give me some advice. The radiologist who administered the injection is away in Australia due back in a week.
Looking forward to anyone who can give me some advice.
Jill Novick

juls said...

Help!!! No one has mentioned the severe and searing pain that wakes you up from a deep sleep at night and keeps you awake for hours. I can live with the pain during the waking hours utilizing the proper foot wear and orthodicts, but the agonizing pain at night might just drive me over the edge to (what? surgery!*&%$, doesn't sound like the answer). I will try the toe seperators tonight and see if that provides some relief. Thank you all for all of your comments and suggestions.

oliveria said...

Oliveria said...It took several years for a diagnosis to come. I experienced excruciating pain, which caused corns, bunions mostly from wearing large shoes due to the pain. I first had the water base shot, immediate relief to both feet...lasted two weeks. Two weeks later had a cortisone shot alchol base, caused an allergic reaction, swelling, muscle spasm and pain. I was on my way to the emergency room, but felt relief from the 800 mg motrim. The doctorsaid some patients tolerate the water base better. I continued with the shots, specifically, 5 shots on the right foot and twice on the left. The left foot is 99% better. However, the right foot is 95% better. A lot of stiffness in the mornings and nites. After completing the shots, I had muscle tightness in my calves, but left after weeks of stretching and I neglected to do.

My question...has any one notice any hair loss, specifically, thinning due to their hair shedding or fallen out by the roots. This started after the last shot; a total of 7 and ended in July, 2009.

I am a runner who used to run at least 3.75 miles 5 days a week and wore high heels at work and out shopping. I no longer wear heels and stopped running due to the pain.

I am ready to start running and started back wearing heels - half a day. I switched shoes twice a day and have 2 pairs of orthodontics fror regular shoes and heels, which were very expensive.

P Mac said...

My MN Story thus far...Help Needed:
Around 9/1/2009 I began having discomfort which I can only trace back to my spinning shoes putting too much pressure on the ball of my foot and squeezing my toes. I have been to therapy (Rehab) for nearly 3 full months now. An Orthopedic has recommended surgery and my Podiatrist wants to do cortisone injections. To manage pain I do an ice bath for my leg (in a cooler) before going to bed each night. When I wake, I soak in a cooler of warm water with Epsom Salt). I don't know how long I can keep doing this. I've had 1 injection that did not go well. I had the week of pain and helped very little. My podiatrist sent my orthotics to Image and had a pad put in and a cutout on the joints around my 2nd/3rd toes. This helps me walk but that's about it. I can't even swim without getting toe cramps. I don't want to do surgery and don't know where to turn from here. I want my life back!! Any help would be greatly appreciated. Does anyone know where to go to get the freeze surgery done? I'm around the Mobile, AL area. Thanks!!!!

anne said...

My Neuroma was caused by spinning as well. I had "cryosurgery" which is simply an injection of freezing which deadens the nerve. It took 6 minutes and worked great! This was over two years ago. I still cannot wear high heels without pain returning, but otherwise no pain and normal activity (but no more SPINNING, thank you).

Usually this is done by pain clinics -mostly for back pain. I found a podiatrist near me in Florida who had purchased the machine - most do not have it because it is very expensive. Try back pain specialists in your area.

P. Mac said...

Thank you Anne! I'll have to look into this.
Another Question about healing:
-Has anyone tried to stay completely off their foot for say 1 month? I'm just wondering if this thing can truly heal on it's own or not. I'm considering asking for a cast so that my leg would be mobilized from calf down. Could use crutches for say 2-3 weeks and then slowly progress to pressure and rehab it. It seems like from what I read, there is no way to heal this thing. Is that just because we can't stay off our feet long enough or is that bad of damage to the nerve already? Thanks:) (PS -> Just looking for any sign of hope as I'd love to avoid surgery, but it sounds like nobody's heals on it's own).

Anonymous said...

Hello,

Has anyone ever had 'Lidocaine IV" done for MN?
I have had physico, meds (I take 37 pills a day to walk from a previous problem .. SEVERE Fibromyalgia? They don't know what I just couldn't walk for 4 1/2 years including a Lot of Morphine and Gabapentin and can not have cortizone (I am alergic), Xylocaine cream I put on top of my foot 3 times a day. And now they are sending me to a pain clinic for this treatment. I have heard you can get "hooked" on this treatment and to be careful. What is it? Can anyone help me please?

Thanks so much everyone...:)

chess said...

I am interested in the idea to stay off the feet completely to lessen the aggravation to the nerves. Will they heal I wonder? I had my ultreasound and they found 3 and then had steroid injections last week., They feel a bit odd, but not very different so far. The doc said a third od people are 'cured' in this way. I think thats probably optomistic. I'm considering the cryosurgery route soon. Ive abandone toe spreaders and inserts to shoes, and wear my Merrel sandals for max comfort in all weathers! I'm having to swim more and cycle as much as possible to stay reasonably fit, as long walks are a thing of the past. It is really miserable making. No doubt about it. And no obvious direction to turn.

P. Mac said...

Well, I have been resting for about 3 full weeks now (no exercising other than walking). I had taped my 2nd/3rd toe with cotton ball between which helped me walk with no pain..eventually like everything else it was temporary. I've just ordered a pair of NB 1120 running shoes to see if that toe box heighth helps. I have tried everything from Asics, Mizuno, Adidas, etc... no running shoe provides enough comfort for my metatarsal pad orthotics and the shoe insole/cushion. With the insole out, my foot feels better, but it puts a lot of pressure on my toe joints which irritates the nerve. I'm able to walk pain free now for the most part but every once in a while it just ...BOOM...feels like a sharp cramp or something. I can't figure it out. I'm also starting to drink Kangen Water which is supposed to be a mineralized water that helps reduce acidity in the body and help with recovery. If all this fails...surgery here I come (especially before it's too late and this runs into another summer). Any thoughts? NOTE: The Dr. recommended not doing complete rest as the muscles would weaken in that area and compound the problem once I begin walking/applying pressure again. Uhhhhh. Pray, Pray, pray I guess

P. Mac said...

In my prior response I reference my running shoes I just ordered as NB 1120's...it's the NB 1123. I use Zappos which allows next day air saver free (ask them to become a VIP) and unlimited exchanges, etc...! Does anyone wear these or recommend shoes that fit well with orthotics + metataral pads

N said...

I tried biopuncture. Injections with Traumeel ( from Heel ) and procaine. And it WORKS !!!! Had the cortisone before and gave me lots of athrophy. I am sure you can find MD's in USA that practises biopuncture.
otherwise contact Heel in USA. Hope this helps.

Anonymous said...

I've found a lot of relief with SmartWool socks. There are different amounts of padding available. They're a bit pricey but last forever and help me to wear regular shoes.

Anonymous said...

TO GARNETLOVER; WHERE IS THE PHOTO OF THE INCISION POST OP U FOUND? I had an op about a month ago in the uk, they did the incision through the ball of the foot, was about 1/2 inch long and healing nicely till I decided to try and dance on it - then go swimming a few weeks later. As a result of my inpatience I may have to wait a while to get back on a snow / surfboard but know it will be worth it. IF ANYONE DOES HAVE SURGERY just take it easy and when the stitches are out massage with oil twice daily. olive oil contains anti oxidants and vitamin E - and is free from chemicals we don't know about. I would advise to do as little as possable for a month afterwards, and borrow lots of dvd's / books before you have surgery, massage the whole leg and foot, and do leg raises, ankle rotations etc.


garnetlover said...

Having pain in my foot which did not fit anything I found for foot pain on the Internet, I went to foot doctor. He diagnosed pressure on the nerve and gave me a nerve block. I had no pain in my foot, or my knee, or my leg, of my hip or my lower back. I can't remember NOT being in pain and was euphoric. It wore off in 48 hours and then he gave me a shot which I believe is Slerosing Shots which were described by others as alcohol. That was 2 days ago and I am miserable. Is this normal? Burning sensations dull throb. I've trid to find information on this threatment but nothing that answers my questions about it! Like others, I don't know if I want to continue with this treatment. I can't use cortisone because of diabetes and bad reactions to it. I found a photo ot a foot with open incision and photo of neuroma and that is a deep cut. I've had history of blot clots, too. I have had my immune system supressed. Not interested in surgery for sure. I've got diabetic shoes by www.drcomfortshoes.com ordered and hope they help. This is a GREAT WEBSITE.

P. Mac said...

Update: Well, I'm giving up!!! I"m scheduled for surgery tentatively for either 3/31 or 4/19. I am so tired of trying everything. I can now only walk forward and backward. Any side motion/turning at all hurts my foot. I have to wear my Nike Air's everywhere...I tried another shoe and it just killed. I'm tired of wearing tennis shoes everywhere. They really don't go well with a suit or dress clothes. Problem: I'm under a pre-existing condition until September so I'm going to be out of pocket. Does anyone have any idea from their insurance bills (from past surgeries) how much the procedure cost them to have a neuroma removed?

Dawn said...

Was interesting to read how many people have Morton's Neuroma. I had surgery on my left foot and it took the feeling of walking on a nail away but the ball of the foot still hurts especially in the damp weather. I purchased a pair of Mephisto shoes called roller walkers. I paid 335.00 Canadian in the U.S. I had heard they were good as your foot rolls forward. I just want to let people know, as other company's are making them now for around $100.00 but if you purchase them be careful. The pain in the back of your legs at first is terrible if you are not used to stretching those muscles. I finally felt I was ready for a longer walk in the shoes. So I did that and the next day my back seized up and I have been in terrible pain with the muscles in my back. I didn't find the shoes helped that much as far as the Morton's Neuroma was concerned. I wish I had my 335. dollars back.

P. Mac said...

Well, surgery is done. I went down to Tampa, FL and had Dr. Katz perform Cryosurgery on my right foot. First couple days after was no problem. Now, the swelling is starting in, but still nothing worse than the neuroma pain offered. I'll keep everyone informed to the status of the healing. The numbness at the tips of my toes (on the inside portion) is setting in and is very weird, but gives me hope that the procedure worked. The procedure took all of 4 minutes and 30 seconds...yep, that's it...crazy. So far so good, I'll keep everyone informed. Has anyone else had any experiences or stories from Cryosurgery?

Anonymous said...

Dear P. Mac,
Thankyou for contributing to the forum. I am really interested to hear how you progress, as I am thinking of going down the same route. Take great care to give your self all the rest you need, wishing you well,
Chess

On 28 April

Anonymous said...

Had a Mortons for about 15 years but only got really bad about 6 years ago. Waited 'til now to do something about it. Had surgery 2 days ago. My surgeon decided to excise it rather than try to treat it with injections. I Googled all the info regarding the operation and was aware of all the people who had the surgery but regretted it. I took a calculated gamble and went through with the operation. Time will tell, but I dont regret it.

Anonymous said...

Had a Mortons for about 15 years but only got really bad about 6 years ago. Waited 'til now to do something about it. Had surgery 2 days ago. My surgeon decided to excise it rather than try to treat it with injections. I Googled all the info regarding the operation and was aware of all the people who had the surgery but regretted it. I took a calculated gamble and went through with the operation. Time will tell, but I dont regret it.

P. Mac said...

I agree with you...I certainly don't regret my procedure either. I'd rather take my chances. If the cryosurgery ends up not working, I'll consent to the standard surgery. The idea of 7 needles in 1 location scares me (regarding the alcohol injections). Other than the lidocaine injection, the Cryosurgery was pain free. I'm back walking around (of course with the mild swelling and little pain but it's from swelling...nothing like the neuroma pain!). I'm expecting a couple more weeks until I fully get the swelling down, etc. but will keep everyone informed. Anonymous, keep us informed to your progress!! Good Luck and be patient :)

Beate said...

after 3 years of hobbling, moleskin, shoe support, steroid injectings and now a bad back from the "funny walk", I have now decided to go for the operation. I am however still trying to find someone in Europe who does the cryogenic neuroablation which is less invasive. Does anyone know a contact? I have searched the internet without success.

Anonymous said...

Well its now 7 days since my Mortons Nueroma was removed. I have never been in pain really. I have taken the odd Co-Codemol but stopped taking the Diclofenac as they were giving me a bad stomach. My foot is still bandaged up until next Friday but the bruising is starting to go down now. Although I'm still limping around the house and using crutches outdoors it is getting easier to get around as the mild discomfort eases off.
I'll keep you up-dated next week.

P. Mac said...

I saw where someone was having trouble during the night sleeping. You might want to try http://www.restoremyfoot.com/
I slept with it on last night and didn't have any pain during the night. Good Luck

Anonymous said...

I had my bandges taken off yesterday. The nurse said the 2" scar was healing well. The area is still a little swollen and tender. I walked out of the hospital with my running shoes on for extra cushoning and walked almost normally without crutches. I walked about 6 miles before my foot became tired. I have a little numbness in my 3rd and 4th toes, which is a little strange. I was told this would happen but was told that I would get used to it. The numbness does not affect my waking, infact I only notice when I'm stationery. The strangest thing post-op is the feeling of slight 'coldness' in the area where the nerve was taken out. It still aches slightly while sat down on an evening but its relieved by filling a hot water bottle with boiling water and resting my foot on top of it. So pleased with the results so far. Will update you in 7 days.

Anonymous said...

The foot is healing really well. No sign of the dreaded nueroma pain which is fantastic. The foot is a little sensitive first thing in the morning but each day it gets better and better. The dull ache that I had a week ago is almost gone and I'm now getting used to the two slightly numb toes that the operation left me with. So much so that I don't notice them. Will keep you posted again in a weeks time.

Larry said...

Im new to the pain but after 8 weeks of crawling hands and knees from the sofa to the bed, I finally went to the foot doctor. I don't know about the rest of you but the swelling in my foot and pain from trying to walk has led me to seek any relief possible. This site is a wealth of information.
As for me I experienced the outbreak after using a ladder while holding a 5 gallon bucket of paint.
One thing for releif from the inflamation I found was the foot spray Tinactin. It brough allmost instant releif from the very inflamed burning foot. Its not a long term cure but it did help provide a few moments of sanity.
Thank you for all who share their journey and hopefully we all find what works best, good luck to you all.

Anonymous said...

Well, this will be my last post. The Nueroma pain is no more. The foot aches slightly on putting weight on it first thing on a morning but it goes back to 'normal' after 5mins or so, but can walk for miles and miles and miles without any pain. I dont think the foot will ever be pain free 'normal' but I think its 100% improvement on what it was pre-op. If you have a Mortons Nueroma, and you have tried every other alternative without success, surgery is a viable option. I dont regret my surgery at all.

Anonymous said...

After almost a year of dealing with increasing pain from a neuroma in my left foot, and having days that I literally could barely walk, I decided to slip a pair of Walk-Fit orthotics I had purchased at Target a few years ago into my shoe. I used the highest arch that came in the package, and of course put them in shoes without an extremely high heel. I have now been pain-free for over a month when I have shoes on with the orthotics. My thought is that it is separating the joints in my foot and eliminating the friction that caused the neuroma to begin with. Regardless, it is such a relief to have stumbled upon something that is working for me. Hope it might help others as well!

Anonymous said...

I said that my last post would be my final one but just to update you. The foot is now 'normal'. I had said that the foot aches first thing on a morning for 5 mins while my foot gets used to bearing the weight again but now that ache has gone. I no longer get a minor/short shooting pain in the area where the nerve was cut. I can only assume that after almost two months the cut nerve has settled down. The numb feeling in my two toes that the operation first left me with has improved greatly.
My surgeon at my post-op check up said the fiberous nerve that was excised was 3cm long and 1cm wide. The width of the damaged nerve was the reason for the pain-such a wide nerve for such a narrow space.
110% happy with the results of my operation-FANTASTIC!!

Anonymous said...

Greetings:

Thanks to Ricklibrarian and all the posters for all the information here.

Someone in these comments asked about physical therapy for treating Morton's Neuroma. I have had very good results in a very short time with a wonderful talented physical therapist, Vivian Eisenstadt. Vivian addresses not only the neuroma but its causes and works to change one's gait, posture and body alignment to treat the neuroma and prevent its reocurrence. (Her website is at ptpt.com).

I had pain in my left foot just below the third and fourth toe for over a year and also started getting pain on the inside of my left ankle. Worsening pain in both these areas drove me to a podiatrist, who diagnosed a neuroma and told me the distortion in my posture and walking that I was creating to avoid the pain of the neuroma had also led to some tendonitis in my left ankle. The podiatrist referred me to Vivian for physical therapy.

Vivian uses a combination of physical therapy, massage, heat and other techniques in her treatment. During our first session, she examined me, and then did some realignment of my body and taught me some exercises that she assigned as homework. She also taught me to walk differently. In that one session she completely eliminated the tendonitis pain and reduced the neuroma pain. I have had three more sessions with Vivian, and two sessions with a massage therapist working under her direction. Progress is steady. Some days I have no neuroma pain, and some days I do have neuroma pain, and I could not figure this out. Vivian told me that the presence or lack of pain relates to how I am walking, tightness in my hips and upper back, and weakness in my ankles. She has given me more treatments and more exercises, and I am confident that things will improve as I learn and practice more and grow stronger. I highly recommend physical therapy to anyone who wants an alternative to drugs or surgery.

Best wishes,

Deborah

Designeer said...

The answer to anyone here who wants to avoid surgery and heal the MN naturally is PROLOTHERAPY. How have so many people missed this solution? I had alot of treatments, continue to run 4 miles every day and still get better, but it takes a year for the nerve to heal after its damaged.

www.caringmedical.com
www.getprolo.com
www.prolonews.com

you're welcome :-)

P. Mac said...

I am going into surgery next week at the Andrews Institute. I feel I've tried everything. I've looked at the prolotherapy as last posted, but this is not for me (travel or expense wise as there is nothing specific in terms of number of treatments, insurance, etc..). Caring Medical couldn't provide this either as their website states. It's a shot in the dark.

Therefore, I've chosen surgery to remove the nerve. Cryosurgery helped reduce the pain, but now it's coming back...just constant soreness in that area and almost like a stone bruise.

CAn anyone provide their suggestions and help in regards to what to expect and their recovery road. Also, any helpful advice on things they did to cope during the down time, etc...

Thanks!!!

Anonymous said...

I stayed in bed with my foot on a pillow for about 24hrs. After that I used crutches and a built up shoe on that foot to help me get around. Any pressure on the front area of the foot/toe area is painfull so use the crutches. This pain lasts about 7 days. Each day the amount of pressure you can apply gets greater so after about 10 days you can get rid of the 'booty' and your walking will improve daily. Your calf muscle on the operated foot will ache when you start to walk normally. This is because while your limping with the crutches you walk differently to avoid pressure on the foot, but it stops hurting when you get back to using your normal walking gaite.
Its now a few months since my op and I can walk 30-40 miles without a hint of pain!!

P. Mac said...

I'm not 15 days post-surgery. I just got my stitches and post-op wrap taken off. I'm still to nervous to put a shoe on so I'm still wearing the surgical boot. I'm not sure how much pressure to put on my foot and am trying to get the inflammation out. HOwever, I'm also ready to get my leg muscles built back up so they will be ready to walk again. Any help or advice on exercises or how much to push yourself please let me know. Also, did anyone take anti-inflammatory meds after surgery to help with inflammation?

Thanks

Anonymous said...

Accupuncture has totally helped me with my neuroma...I wonder how Rick's healed?

Morton's Nueroma Blog said...

I am glad you not suffering too much Rick! At the moment my Morton's is still not too bad but i am researching non-surgical treatments so it wont get any worse. I know people who have had surgery but i just don't want to go down the route.

Lauren Burton said...

I have read all these comments to date and have summarized the solutions presented in them on my blog at www.relentlesspursuitofhealth.com. Hope it's helpful to you.

I am going to try cold laser tomorrow to help my Morton's Neuroma. I'll let you know how it works out.

Chris Freeland said...

I'm just now slightly more than 24 hours out of surgery to remove a neuroma between the 2nd & 3rd toes on my right foot. My ortho also found a fair amount of scar tissue in the space and removed that as well. My foot is starting to get the pins & needles feeling, which I know is good, and I'm regaining movement in my toes. I'm getting around once every couple of hours to very lightly stretch my hips, knees, legs, ankles & toes. I'm on crutches, and will be until I get my stitches out in 10 days. My foot is still feeling the effects of the block and I'm on serious pain meds, but so far so good.

I'm glad to have found this site. It made me ask some new questions I hadn't considered with my ortho, and I know I went into surgery & recovery with a much more realistic view of what I was in for.

Chris Freeland said...

I've written about my experience & recovery from surgery at http://blog.chrisfreeland.com/2010/12/surgery-for-mortons-neuroma-recovery-or.html I hope someone finds it helpful, as I found this post.

Artnik said...

Thanks for all your research!

Diane said...

I have just read all of the posts here. I am in the beginning stages of MN. I have pain only when I have been hiking or walking for over an hour. It goes away when I stop moving. I've pretty much given up on hiking boots and wear running shoes or trail running shoes with
an insert from Foot Works (made in Hood River Oregon). I purchase my inserts from Foot Traffic in Portland, OR. http://www.foottraffic.us/about_us.php

My concern is that I don't make my Neuroma worse so that I end up with constant pain. Do you feel that if I take care of it, with proper shoes, supports it will NOT get worse?

I'm going to try some of the things I've read about on this site... the yoga toes/pedi pads, Ayuruedic Tea and garlic. Also I'll try out Crocs and Birkenstocks. Those of you with constant pain what do you wish you had done differently?

Thank you!

Anonymous said...

I found that the cortisone injections I had really flared my foot up and started me down this road I was trying to avoid. Sometimes I wonder if I would have left things alone I would be better off. The pain and swelling I have now is nothing compared to what I first had 2 years ago. I blame a lot of the pain I have now on these procedures. After the cortisone injections I did two cryo surgeries which I lost the feeling in the inside of my 4th toe but had more swelling at the ball of my foot. This last December I had six alcohol injections. They have not done any good as well. Just left me with a cold burning foot. I have gotten to a point where the only thing I can where is Crocs flip flops.I have spent a lot on Orthotics and shoes. Nothing really did help for very long. I also bought a Cold laser since someone posted that helped them. I am sending it back. I think it may be time to give in and roll the dice on surgery like others have done in past posts.

Anonymous said...

Take it from a suffer of 20 plus years who has tried it ALL...alcohol injections and CROCS. I own every pair of CROCS ever made and I make them work in my professional and personal life. They are the key!

Monica said...

I have been dealing with Morton's Neuroma for about five years now. At first it was painful with any shoe that was alittle snug...I have a wider foot getting wider all the time as I have started to develope a bunion on that foot. In the summer, with nice comfortable sandles it felt fine but come fall, and shoes, it got really bad. The podietrist began with cortisone shots which didn't agree with me, gave me high blood pressure and palpatations. Then I had a series of five alcohol shots which finally did relieve the pain almost completely. After almost a year the pain returned, and the dr. told me the next junction over had started to develope a nueroma. It is most common in between the third and fourth, but can form between any two. After another alcohol shot in that one, I finally decided to opt for sugery and have them both removed. It has been almost five months, and at this point I wish I had stuck with the other treatments. Then the pain was intermittent, now I am not in terrible pain, but I am "bothered" every day. If I had it to do over again, I would not have the surgery!

Anonymous said...

I had a Mitchells otomomny(radical bunion joint surgery both feet aged 19, then I finally gave in and had a joint fused in 2nd toe aged 36, my physio back then told me I had a mortons neuroma, I finally gave in to treatment on wednesday, I cannot believe I cannot load bear right foot when left foot fine? I have hypermobility in feet anyway, any suggestions because I've had gruesome foot pain for38 years and it's getting rather boring now.

Anonymous said...

I have had Morton's Neuroma for 6 years. Orthotics, cortizone injections, physio,acupuncture, Birks, you name it and I think I have tried it. I finally got referred to a physiatrist ant got a botox injection...now after 3 months it is wearing off and I will get another one. How do you spell relief...BOTOX..can't believe it.

Anonymous said...

Great site. I've dealt with MN on my left foot for about 2 years, interspace 2/3 rather than 3/4. I had 1-2 cortizone shots with minimal relief and have had a series of 8 alchohol shots, ranging from 4% to 8% to 12%--I finally got about 80% relief with the 12% shots. I finished this series about 8 months ago and I'm noticing the pain is coming back, which brought me to this site. I am starting another series of 12% shots but would like something more permanent. I am 53 and not overweight and it great health otherwise. I believe that years of high heels and high impact aerobics are what caused the neuroma, but who knows for sure? I am going to look into the cold laser and also the cyrosurgery as both look promising. I'd like to avoid surgery although a good friend of mine had it 8-10 years ago with great success.

SearchingMNCure said...

Thanks Designer for once again bringing up PROLOTHERAPY. I am currently being treated by prolotherapy for sacrum pain and instability which it seems to be helping. I've read your MN journey on the other site and am considering it. Since I live on the west coast I've called prolo docs here and out of 7,3 say it doesn't work for MN and 4 say it does. You are the only patient I know of that can testify that it does work. Was your doctor in Chicago able to give you any testimonials from his office? I emailed his office and they said prolo works 85% of the time.

I want to thank you for all of your detailed posts. They are very encouraging and have helped me not feel like giving up. I have MN in both feet and now with the back issues, I feel overwhelmed at times.

As for all the other treatments: I've had 3 sets of cortisone a year and a half ago and orthodics made by my podiatrist. These are only temporary treatments, not cures. I'm looking for a cure.

If anyone else has used PROLOTHERAPY, COLD LASER THERAPY OR CRYOGENIC FREEZING and it's lasted for more than a year, please share.

Good luck to everyone.

Anonymous said...

A podiatrist diagnosed Morton's neuroma, palpitated the nerve so as to create much more pain, then cut off all the calluses so that I was unable to walk comfortably for many weeks, fitted an expensive and not very comfortable orthotic. Caveat emptor! Suggestions for other readers: consider getting an orthotic from Walmart's Dr. Scholl's machine for $50; don't ever get rid of your calluses; some podiatrists suggest making a patch with moleskin that will elevate the adjacent 4th metatarsal to promote healing of the neuroma; or if it's really, really awful, find a podiatrist who will treat the condition with cryosurgery (injection with liquid nitrogen to freeze the swelling). See also http://www.gellerpodiatry.com/mortons-neuroma/

Kim/AR said...

11-7-2011 Please include the year when you post as I've read the entire site and had no idea when these posts occurred. My story is the same as everyone else. Over 10 years of pain, common sense, then medically directed attempts to cure (no surgery yet), all without long term success. I'm having radiofrequency ablation this Friday. It will be performed at a pain clinic where they treat primarily cervical and lumbar pain. I will post my experiences afterwards.

Thanks for this site. It contains more good information than any other.

Kim/Arkansas

Kim/AR said...

I had the radio frequency ablation on my foot today. Took about an hour. He gave me a lidocaine injection to numb it, then inserted a tube (canula?) into my foot (from the top). He then gave me 2 injections through the tube into the nerve to deaden it. Waited a few minutes and then inserted the radio frequency line into the tube and cranked up the machine and zapped it. I thought I'd go through the roof ~ WOW it hurt. So he took the probe out, and gave me 2 more injections into the nerve... inserted the line again and zapped it. I felt some tingling, but that was all. He repeated this with 2 injections and then a zap into 3 more areas of the nerve. My foot is still numb and will be for about 12 hours. I walked out in my boots and went shopping and then to lunch. So far, so good. He says there's about an 80% success rate of no more pain. In the other 20%, the patients have about 75% relief. Some of those repeat the procedure one more time...most do not. I'll have to wait a day or two to find out how effective it was, but I'm really optimistic that this will take care of the neuroma pain. If all goes well, I'll take my walk on Sunday. I should have done this years ago!

Kim/AR said...

Day 2 after the RFA - not good. I spoke too soon. Foot is bruised, swollen and painful. Back to using the cane today.

Kim/AR said...

Day 4 After RFA... I'm feeling good. Swelling is gone, bruising is almost gone. Pain level has gone from (on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the worst) around 1...sometimes no pain at all. I'm very optimistic that this is the fix for me.

Bonnie said...

I have had Morton's Neuroma in both my feet for over 40 years. The best thing for me is to wear wide shoes. It's not easy finding wide width shoes for a woman but it can be done. I also have custom insoles with a metatarsal pad. No pain unless I wear tight shoes.

Emma said...

This blog has been very, very helpful. Was feeling very alone in all of this and my 4 pages of notes no longer makes me feel that way! Thank you to all for sharing.

carol said...

i'm going to be getting my third alcohol shot next week/ i was scared; got through the holiday with discomfort i am told from the shot/ but the pain on a short standing and walking about an hour shows me they can help/ bow getting out of bed in the morning i can rekax without pain for a while

Anonymous said...

I have been suffering with this for over a year. I waited a long time to go to the dr hoping it would go away. I have found that for me, barefoot is best but this being VT shoes are a must most of the time. I have found that Sketcher brand Shape-ups to be the most comfortable shoe and can wear them pain free all day. I also work in a library and am on my feet most all day. I have also found that on those days that I really want to wear something else that a cotton ball between the affected toes spreads the metatarsals enough to allow me to wear other shoes that would normally cause pain. Yes, you do have the feeling of something stuck between your toes but it's soft and not that annoying and it is pain free. For those who say I should just wear my shape-ups, well, sometimes you can't. I dance and I motorcycle ride and those are just 2 activities that require special footwear.

lindamae said...

1st Feb 2012
Hi All - this is such a useful site - many thanks.
I have had MN - both feet, between 3rd and 4th toe, for about 5 years. I have the world's best collection of insoles, and think the metatarsal pad helps and wide shoes. I had my first cortisone injection a few weeks ago and am hard put to say whether it's helped or not - seemed a little better at first but now I'm not so sure. He said he thought I should have 2 or 3 at 6 week intervals and I am due to go back to see on the ultrasound if the size has reduced.
I am in the UK and am trying to find out if alcohol injections are available here. I found a research paper about a study done at the Royal Orthopaedic hospital, which had good results but I can't get a referral there. If anyone knows I would be really grateful.

Anonymous said...

Interesting that so many comments are from ACTIVE folks. I spin a lot, hike a lot, and gym it a lot. I have NEVER worn high heals and only wear expensive WIDE shoes, yet I too suffer from MN (and bunions). Cortisone shots are painful, only offer temporary relief. Orthodics help, but tend to be hard. I appreciate everyone's advice on this Cryognic freezing and I intend to seek it out vs. doing surgery and more shots. I will also try acupuncture. I just want to be able to live an active life again! Thanks to all for your experiences and suggestions!

Anonymous said...

Interesting that so many comments are from ACTIVE folks. I spin a lot, hike a lot, and gym it a lot. I have NEVER worn high heals and only wear expensive WIDE shoes, yet I too suffer from MN (and bunions). Cortisone shots are painful, only offer temporary relief. Orthodics help, but tend to be hard. I appreciate everyone's advice on this Cryognic freezing and I intend to seek it out vs. doing surgery and more shots. I will also try acupuncture. I just want to be able to live an active life again! Thanks to all for your experiences and suggestions!

Anonymous said...

I am very active. Lately when I ride my bike I start to feel my neuroma! I have to say I am riding less and less...trying to avoid the intense pain that some are describing here!

Debi said...

Thank you so much for this wealth of information. I have 2 MN--one in each foot--and have undergone 2 rounds of cortisone shots at two week intervals. The pain for me was excruciating, and I'm supposed to go back this week. After reading about the damage these shots can do, I'm canceling. I wanted to tell you about a new line of flip flops by Sanuk. They have yoga mat soles which provide unbelievable cushion. Fortunately, I live in Florida, so I've bought several pair in different colors. I'm not sure where I'll go from here. But at least I've found many options other than those horrible shots.

Debi said...

There is a great flip flop made by Sanuk with yoga mat soles. They are the only shoes I can wear that give me the cushion I need. Thank you for this excellent forum--very helpful.

Kim/AR said...

I've tried Sanuk's and they don't help me because there is no arch support. Olu Kai (from Ohana) are flip flops with arch support and they're wonderful. But pricey.

On 11-11-11 I had RFA (radio frequency ablation) on my neuroma. I was pain free for about 8 months, but the pain is gradually returning. It's worst when I first put my feet on the floor and eases as I walk. By the end of the day the pain is back but not as intense as it was prior to the RFA. I'll probably do it again in a month or so as I've been told it's only effective for about a year (for some people and I guess I'm one of those). My only concern is that the neuroma is continuing to enlarge and that I am just postponing what will be an inevitable surgery.

Has anyone else had RFA?

Krissy said...

I have had Morton's Neuroma for a long time now. I went to the dr about two years ago. I was looking for work and all I could find were jobs where you had to stand all day, which was out of the question with the pain I had wearing reg shoes all day. I did have a MRI done on my foot for a correct diagnosis. She told me I didn't need surgery, but she suggested Cortisone shots, but I found a job where I don't need to stand all day. I mentioned getting cortisone shots to my PC doctor and he said "don't do it"! I never asked him why but I felt I didn't need them when I can sit down, take off my shoe and rub my foot anytime I need to. I will say I have a pair of Croc flip flops and they are the only shoe I can wear and walk in for so much longer in than any shoe I have ( I have always bought good quality shoes with a comfort padding. I also have clarks clogs with a nice cushion soles I wear in the winter and I can usually wear them for about two hours without pain. Forget any shoe where your whole foot is enclosed. I wear a size 7 shoe and I have tried 8 wide with no luck. (any larger and my foot slidesudamber out of the shoe. So for those who have Morton's ... try Crocs flip flops, they have a great cushion sole and I have found with Morton's you need to be able to move your toes freely, but still have a cushioned sole for protection. BTW, When I push on the ball of my foot by the 3rd and 4th toe I don't feel pain but when I press on the top of my foot in the same area I can feel the pain. My pain is so unbearable if I wear shoes that are enclosed. I have to sit right down and take off my shoe and move my toes and upper foot and massage it for 5 minutes, then I am good to go until the pain starts again... and it does always come back but I can go much longer in Crocs flip flops than any other shoe. Great site thank you for having this for us who suffer from Morton's

janet said...

I've been struggling with this for a year. I have never worn tight or high-heeled shoes, only Danskos and sneakers. Cortisone was a bust. Orthotics are only as long as your foot doesn't move, and are insanely expensive. The condition isn't actually a neuroma, it's a fibrosis, the result of your pinched nerve in your foot protecting itself.

I've been separating my toes with my fingers for the last month, and really spending time on calf stretching/foot widening & flexibility exercises, and finally getting relief. I'm about to order separators from correct toes.

The foot and ortho people wanted me to think it was some kind of defect, but it's just the result of bad posture, weight gain, aging and tight muscles, like any other pinched nerve. Look at your feet. If you're now stepping on toes with other toes, try to get them back to straight.

Why do we get braces to straighten our teeth, but the podiatrists & orthos just want to remove healthy (if inflamed) tissue in a really painful operation? Why not just straighten toes?

Anonymous said...

NON-SURGICAL RELIEF: I have had the symptoms of Morton's Neuroma for approximately 5 years now, with the rock under the foot, socks balled up in your shoe, numbness and then excruciating pain progression of symptoms over that time. I finally had the diagnosis a few weeks ago by my podiatrist at which time he recommended (and gave me) a cortisone shot. The pain from the shot was minimal and unfortunately, so too was the relief. The Dr had said the next course of action was alcohol injections or surgery. After reading so many horror stories online about both treatments, and as someone who makes my living on my feet teaching tennis, I was and am feeling reluctant to try either option. On a particularly painful day on the court last week, I took off my shoe and spread my third and fourth toe with my fingers and got instant relief from the pain. The pain returned in an hour or so so I repeated the process and got enough relief to get me through the day. So next day I put a piece of Kleenex secured with a bandaid between the two toes and had little to no pain all day on the court. I found gel toe spacers in Walgreens and tried those the next day and again had little to no pain. My toes were a little sore from the spacer the first day but now for a week I have been on the tennis court pain free. The same day I found the gel spacers I also found Flex-Tastic toe spacers which when worn 5-10 minutes a day, helps relieve the cramped toes which probably started the neuroma and other foot pains I'm experiencing. So far the combination of these two treatments are allowing me to move and play at full speed on the tennis court with no pain. I don't know if the neuroma will go away or at least calm down enough to avoid surgery in the future, but right now I am elated hat I found a non-surgical way to eliminate the pain. Toe spacers, toe stretchers, and a looser, wider sneaker have made the difference.

Anonymous said...

I regretfully squished my left foot repeatedly by jamming it between slats to help me climb over my patio railing in July 2012. Quickly diagnosed Morten's. When I have a flare-up, Ibuprofen eliminates the pain for 8-10 hours. The Walking Store scanned my foot and I use their recommended orthodic or the Texton 3/4 insert EVERY time I wear shoes or else I suffer. At home I slip a cushioned insole inside my sock. I'm starting acupuncture from a practitioner skilled in treating nerve damage next week. Massaging my foot triggers a flare-up.

Chuck said...

Didn't work for me at all. Finally had surgery last week. Still healing and surgically sore but hopeful.

Chuck said...

Something is wrong. I had about 15 injections and, though painful, was nowhere close to your description. Especially with your comparison with knee surgery.

Chuck said...

Unfortunately you have gotten in a tug-of-war between two doctors. Several things I don't understand. Where did the Overload dx come from? If not extensive testing done I would say premature. Why is one injection all he will give when it's shown that they have cumulative effect and can take 10-15 to work? Why do one if no plan to follow through? Lyrica is a joke and I see few patients who respond except as a placebo effect. And pain clinics are not indicated for your status. Also hard shoes with inflexible inserts are foolish as large toe boxes on flexible shoes may provide some relief. Think Crocs as someone mentioned. Finally surgery is a realistic option if your overall medical condition will allow. I think you need to remove yourself from these Nazi doctors who want to be right rather than provide adequate care. Find a third after doing research to find the best podiatrist in your area. Good luck.

Chuck said...

Already coming down I'm sure but I think you're foolish not to take the time off find out what's wrong rather than participate in this bike race.

Chuck said...

What is it that makes you not understand that you have a structural problem in your foot and it's not going to get better by ignoring it and continuing to run and participate in contraindicated activities?

Chuck said...

Now 2+ weeks post surgery and disappointed. Foot is just as sore if not worse. Pain feels the same. Surgical site is healed but it is dis colored from inside big to inside of little toes. Dr says doing fine and will get better. Hmmm? I am hopeful current pain is from going in and ripping and tearing the insides apart and will heal given time.

Anonymous said...

I was diagnosed with mortons neuroma in both feet about 15 years ago. Probably caused by the ridiculous shoes I wore at work everyday. I was in the military and had no choice. I had a series of the alcohol shots (about 6 in each foot) was fitted for inserts and soon retired. This allowed me to wear the inserts and reasonable shoes. I was good to go for a few years till the inserts started to cause other pain. Ditched them and just wore sneakers. Slow but sure the pain started up again about two years ago. Now I carry an instant ice pack everywhere I go, can't be on my feet more than 10 minutes. Currently have a podiatry appt pending. DEC 4TH, looking for an earlier appt elsewhere. Bottom line is I don't know how effective the painful alcohol shots were since I changed my footwear and started using the inserts at the same time. Good luck to everyone who suffers I know how painful this can be.

Anonymous said...

I have had the alcohol shots in both feet about 10 years ago. At the same time was fitted for inserts and began wearing better shoes (mostly sneakers)
When I began an exercise regime which included walking. After about 6 weeks the pain started up again. I cut out the walking. I am to the point where I ice my feet on and off all day long. Currently pending a podiatry appt. I was on this sight hoping for NEW treatment choices. So far I haven't seen one.

Chuck said...

I have never known anyone personally who got any relief from any type of injection. I didn't. I even had surgery and that didn't help and I have pain 24/7. Shoes have no effect and, according to doctors, there's nothing they can do. So I live with it.

Does anyone have any recommendations for a next step for what has been diagnosed as non diabetic Perferial Neuroma?